Japan’s Underwater Aircraft Carriers – part one

Pacific Paratrooper

Lieutenant Commander Stephen L. Johnson had a problem on his hands; a very large problem. His Balao-class submarine, the Segundo, had just picked up a large radar contact on the surface about 100 miles off Honshu, one of Japan’s home islands, heading south toward Tokyo.  World War II in the Pacific had just ended, and the ensuing cease fire was in its 14th day. The official peace documents would not be signed for several more days.

As Johnson closed on the other vessel, he realized it was a gigantic submarine, so large in fact that it first looked like a surface ship in the darkness. The Americans had nothing that size, so he realized that it had to be a Japanese submarine.

This was the first command for the lanky 29-year-old commander. He and his crew faced the largest and perhaps the most advanced submarine in the world…

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Author: deplorablesunite

I am a divorced father of two daughters. I am a Deplorable. The cat in my profile is my buddy Ronnie Whiskers

4 thoughts on “Japan’s Underwater Aircraft Carriers – part one”

  1. I’m thankful that you continue to have an interest in history!

    (It would be helpful for you to reach readers if you used Tags, such as WWII, WW2, History, etc.)

    Like

      1. Below your post you will see ‘Edit’. All that will come up in the Editor is whatever you wrote, but on the right side you will see Comments and Tags. Add what you want and then click the ‘Update’ button.
        For your regular posts, as you put them together, scroll down to find an empty space where you can find the word ‘Tags’.

        Like

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