Joe Biden on Migrant Detention Centers: ‘Close Them Down!’

H/T Breitbart.

In spite of what Slow Joe The Gaff Machine says we need more detention centers.

GREENVILLE, South Carolina — Former vice president Joe Biden told an town hall at Clinton College in Rock Hill, South Carolina, on Thursday afternoon that he would close down migrant shelters and detention facilities at the border.

Biden was asked by a Clinton College student what he would do to improve and help migrants in the facilities reunite with their families.

“Close them down!” Biden declared, to loud applause.

“No, no, no, no, no, no,” he continued. “We don’t need them. We [meaning President Barack Obama and himself] found that, when we were in office, in fact … [when] we finally got things under control, you have to report back for a hearing on such-and-such a date, people show up!”

Biden neglected to mention that many of the migrant shelters and detention facilities were opened under the Obama administration (or, as Biden refers to it, the “Obama-Biden administration”), after a massive surge of unaccompanied minors to the border.

Moreover, the Department of Homeland Security recently reported to Congress that as many as 90 percent of so-called “asylum-seekers” failed to show up for their court hearings.

Other Democratic presidential candidates have also called for the facilities to be closed, including Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA).

It is not clear how Biden and the other candidates propose to care for unaccompanied minors who cross the border illegally, or for others arrested (or rescued) at the border.

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Trump Could Be the Next George H.W. Bush

H/T Yahoo News.

I do not see any similarities between George H.W.Bush and President Trump.

The economy is going full blast and President Trump has kept all of his promises.

(Bloomberg Opinion) — Donald Trump is dangerously close to becoming the first Republican president since George H.W. Bush to raise taxes. According to the Tax Foundation, if the tariffs already announced by Trump go into effect, they will amount to a $200 billion annual tax increase. That’s larger than the $165 billion average annual reduction in 2017’s Tax Cut and Jobs Act.

Bush’s brazen break with Republican orthodoxy, along with a sluggish economy and broken promises, made him a one-term president. If Trump’s not careful, he may join him.

In his 1988 campaign, Bush famously asked the public to read his lips when he promised “no new taxes.” While Bush had been Ronald Reagan’s vice president, he came from an earlier generation of moderate Republicans. Movement conservatives always had doubts about his fealty to their low-tax agenda.

As it turned out, those concerns were justified. In 1990, two years after a successful campaign based in part on a commitment to fight Congress’s attempts to raise taxes, Bush faced a rising deficit and a Congress reluctant to cut domestic spending. He caved. In June he announced that he was willing to accept a budget that not only cut defense spending but also included tax increases.

The final package included increases in both income and payroll taxes and went into effect in 1991. In the next year’s campaign, Bush had to deal with rising unemployment and withering criticism in both the primary and the general election over his decision to go back on his pledge.

Trump’s situation is not exactly analogous, of course. But his fate could be same. In his 2016 campaign, Trump promised that nearly every American would see a tax cut. He also pledged to renegotiate America’s “horrible trade deals” and reinvigorate U.S. manufacturing. When those negotiations failed and a trade war broke out, Trump assured Americans that trade wars were good and easy to win.

That hasn’t exactly worked out. The trade war has been raging for nearly 18 months, the trade deficit continues to increase and manufacturing growth is beginning to slump. Meanwhile, the White House continues to assure Americans that the trade war is only temporary.

The reality looks different: Every bit of good news is soon undermined by a stumble. Tariffs are still rising, and the trade war is taking an increasing toll on the broader economy.

So far the trade war’s effect has been felt primarily in business investment. Analysis from JP Morgan Chase & Co., however, suggests that consumers will soon be feeling the pinch as well. If fully implemented, this next phase of Trump’s tariffs will cost the average household up to $1,795 per year — $495 more than the bank’s estimate of the average increase in disposable income from tax reform. (The biggest tax cuts in the 2017 law were on the corporate side; they weren’t paid out to any actual humans.)

If consumer spending starts to slip, there won’t be much left propping up economic growth. This combination of weak growth, a rising tax burden and broken promises echoes the 1992 election. In addition, Trump is already accumulating primary challengers who will no doubt criticize him for his failure to deliver. When the Democrats pile on, it will be that much harder for the president to make his case for re-election.

In tone and substance, Donald Trump and George H.W. Bush are nearly polar opposites. In terms of their economic and political circumstances, however, they are eerily similar — in a way that should raise some doubts about Trump’s chances of re-election.

To contact the author of this story: Karl W. Smith at ksmith602@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Newman at mnewman43@bloomberg.net

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Karl W. Smith is a former assistant professor of economics at the University of North Carolina’s school of government and founder of the blog Modeled Behavior.

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

President Trump Just Nominated More Judges and One is Especially Good News

H/T Town Hall.

Hopefully, these judges will be more originalist that judicial activist.

The Constitution needs to be upheld and not rewritten. 

President Trump has announced the nomination of additional judges to sit on the federal bench, including on the notoriously leftist Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Here’s the full list, provided by the White House:

Danielle J. Hunsaker of Oregon, to serve as Circuit Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

William J. Nardini of Connecticut, to serve as Circuit Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

 Fernando L. Aenlle-Rocha of California, to serve as Judge on the United States District Court for the Central District of California

Adam L. Braverman of California, to serve as Judge on the United States District Court for the Southern District of California

Silvia Carreno-Coll of Puerto Rico, to serve as Judge on the United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico

John M. Gallagher of Pennsylvania, to serve as Judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania

Barbara Bailey Jongbloed of Connecticut, to serve as Judge on the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut

Sandy Nunes Leal of California, to serve as Judge on the United States District Court for the Central District of California

Shireen Matthews of California, to serve as Judge on the United States District Court for the Southern District of California

Rick Richmond of California, to serve as Judge on the United States District Court for the Central District of California

Daniel Mack Traynor of North Dakota, to serve as Judge on the United States District Court for the District of North Dakota

Cory T. Wilson of Mississippi, to serve as Judge on the United States District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi

Grant C. Jaquith of New York, to serve as Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims

Scott J. Laurer of Virginia, to serve as Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has vowed to confirm as many judicial nominees as possible by the end of the year.

Henry Johnson the One-Man Army Who Fought Off, Dozens of German Soldiers During World War I

H/T Mental Floss.

R.I.P. Sergeant Henry Johnson July 15,1892-July 1,1929.

It was after midnight on May 15, 1918 when William Henry Johnson began to hear the rustling. Johnson was a long way from his home in Albany, New York, guarding a bridge in the Argonne Forest in Champagne, France. Sleeping next to him was Needham Roberts, a fellow soldier. Both men had enlisted in the New York National Guard just a few months earlier and were now part of the French Army, donated by U.S. forces to their understaffed allies in the thick of World War I.

As Johnson continued hearing the strange noises late into the night, he urged his partner to get up. A tired Roberts waved him off, believing Johnson was just nervous. Johnson decided to prepare himself just in case, piling up his assortment of grenades and rifle cartridges within arm’s reach. If someone was coming, he would be ready.

The rustling continued. At one point, Johnson heard a clipping noise—what he suspected was the sound of the perimeter fence being cut. He again told Roberts to wake up. “Man,” he said, “You better wake up pretty soon or you [might] never wake up.”

The two began lobbing grenades into the darkness, hoping to discourage whoever might be lurking around the perimeter. Suddenly, in the middle of the French forest, Johnson saw dozens of German soldiers come charging, bayonets pointed toward him. They began to fire.

What transpired over the next hour would become an act of heroism that prompted former President Theodore Roosevelt to declare Johnson one of the bravest Americans to take up arms in the war. Johnson would even lead a procession back in New York City, with crowds lined up along the street to greet him.

Johnson may or may not have felt like a hero, though he certainly was. But he must have also felt something else—a sense of confusion. A man of color, he had been dispatched to a segregated regiment, where he received paltry combat training and was assigned menial tasks like unloading trucks. Even his homecoming parade was split up according to race. Henry Johnson, decorated virtually head to toe in French military honors, returned to a country that considered him both hero and a second-class citizen.

 

Though officers would later verify much of Johnson’s account of that night in the woods, his early life is harder to pin down. It has been reported that Johnson himself wasn’t quite sure when he was born. No one appeared to have kept a close eye on his birth certificate, which came out of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The official U.S. Army website honoring Johnson’s service lists an approximate birth date of July 15, 1892. Other research indicates he could have been born as early as 1887 or as late as 1897.

After moving to New York as a teenager, Johnson took on an assortment of odd jobs; he was a chauffeur and a soda mixer, among other occupations. Depending on the account, he was living in Albany working either in a coal yard or as a railway porter when he opened a newspaper in the spring of 1917 and read that the 15th New York Infantry Regiment of the New York National Guard was accepting enlistees. The regiment was comprised entirely of black soldiers.

Sergeant William Henry Johnson poses for a photo in uniform

Sergeant William Henry Johnson poses for a photo in uniform.
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS // PUBLIC DOMAIN

Johnson showed up on June 5, 1917, weighing a slight 130 pounds and standing 5 feet, 4 inches tall. Assigned to Company C of the 15th—which later became known as the 369th U.S. Infantry Regiment—he was quickly dispatched to Camp Wadsworth in South Carolina, where he trained along with the rest of the segregated unit. Though minorities had served in the U.S. military since the Revolutionary War, they often lacked support from officials and got inferior training compared to their white counterparts. At Camp Wadsworth, Johnson was said to have been used primarily as labor, unloading supplies and digging latrines. If there was one bright spot during this time, it was that he married his wife, Georgina Edna Jackson, that September.

Johnson and the 369th were sent to France on January 1, 1918. There they continued laboring, which frustrated their commander, Colonel William Hayward. Hayward lobbied his superiors to give his men a chance in combat. Since France was experiencing a shortage of men, the 369th—which later became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because many of their members had come from Harlem in New York City—joined the 161st Division of the French Army, even wearing the jackets and helmets of the foreign military.

To the French, Johnson and his fellow soldiers were a welcome solution to their lack of manpower. Sent to the front lines in March 1918, Johnson and the others learned enough French to understand commands from superiors. They were armed with rifles and held on to the bolo knives used by the U.S. Army. The imposing 14-inch blades weighed more than a pound and had much of their weight running along the back, giving them a cleaving action similar to a machete. Johnson would soon be glad he had such a weapon on his waist.

Along with Needham Roberts—a man from Trenton, New Jersey—Johnson was assigned sentry duty on the western edge of the Argonne Forest. Patrolling near a bridge, Johnson and Roberts were given the late shift, on patrol until midnight on the evening of May 14. It would be a night neither he nor Roberts would ever forget.

As their shift wound down, Johnson saw two relief soldiers approaching. The soldiers were young and inexperienced, and Johnson felt uncomfortable leaving them alone. He stayed put and surveyed the area while Roberts went to rest in a trench. Shortly thereafter, he began to hear the rustling noises, which eventually became German soldiers rushing through the darkness. Johnson realized they were surrounded, and urged Roberts to run for help. But Roberts didn’t get far before he decided to come back and help, and was soon hit by the shrapnel of a grenade in his arm and hip.

Still conscious, Roberts handed Johnson grenades to toss. When those ran out, Johnson began firing his rifle while being hit by bullets in his side, hand, and head. Quickly, Johnson shoved an American cartridge into his French rifle, but the ammunition and the weapon were incompatible. The rifle jammed. As the Germans swarmed him, Johnson began using the rifle like a club, smashing it over their heads and into their faces.

After the butt of the rifle finally fell apart, Johnson went down with a blow to the head. But he climbed back up, drew his bolo knife, and charged forward. The blade went deep into the first German he encountered, killing the man. More gruesome work with the weapon followed, with Johnson hacking and stabbing bodies even as bullets continued to strike him.

An illustration depicts William Henry Johnson fighting off German soldiers

An illustration by artist Charles Alston depicts William Henry Johnson fighting off German soldiers. The artwork was used by the Office for Emergency Management (OEM) to inspire American soldiers during World War II.
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS // PUBLIC DOMAIN

At one point, Johnson noticed the Germans had grabbed Roberts and were attempting to haul him away. He intervened, stabbing more soldiers, including one in the ribs.

The melee went on for roughly an hour, he said. When reinforcements finally arrived, the remaining Germans fled. Johnson was given medical attention. So was Roberts. Both lived.

The next day, military officials visited the scene of the battle. German helmets rested on the ground, along with puddles of blood. Four bodies were left behind. The officials estimated Johnson had wounded up to 24 others. Some men who walked the site said the death toll was six, with Johnson injuring 32 men. After all the fighting, Johnson had prevented the Germans from breaking the French line.

The nicknames came fast. The bridge was declared “the Battle of Henry Johnson.” Johnson himself was given the unofficial label “the Black Death” and the official rank of sergeant. He was headed back home.

 

Before they departed, the French honored Johnson and Roberts with the Croix de Guerre, one of France’s highest awards for valor. They were the first two Americans to receive it. Johnson’s was amended with the addition of the Gold Palm, intended to signify extraordinary valor.

It was an honor, though one that came with a heavy price. Johnson later estimated he had been shot five times, the bullets striking both feet, his thigh, his arm, and even his head. A scar stretched over his lip. A bayonet had been plunged into his torso—twice. He had to have a metal plate inserted into his left foot. In all, Johnson endured 21 injuries as a result of his defiant stand against the Germans.

Back home, he convalesced as the country sang his praises. Often, such reports of his bravery took pains to note he was a man of color. “When proudly speaking of fighting races we must not overlook the American Negro,” read an editorial in the New York Evening Telegram. Other times, Johnson found himself in the peculiar position of being celebrated while simultaneously being reminded of his purportedly inferior status. The parade that honored the Harlem Hellfighters in February 1919 ran for seven miles, with Johnson leading the procession in an open-topped cab. But the Hellfighters could not march with their white counterparts.

Needham Roberts (L) and William Henry Johnson (R) pose for a photo with their Croix de Guerre medals in 1918

Needham Roberts (L) and William Henry Johnson (R) pose for a photo with their Croix de Guerre medals in 1918.
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS // PUBLIC DOMAIN

Unfortunately, Johnson’s postwar life remains as murky as his earliest years. He reportedly received disability payments from the government as well as medical care, but it’s unknown to what extent that supported him or how badly his injuries kept him from employment opportunities. (He did ask for, and received, as much as $100 per minute during speaking engagements in cities such as St. Louis—well over $1000 in today’s money.) An attempt was made by the Albany Afro-American Association to raise money to build him a home as a way of expressing gratitude for his service, but it’s unclear whether the effort was successful. On July 1, 1929, Johnson died of myocarditis (an inflammation of the heart muscle) while living in Washington, D.C. He was awarded a posthumous Purple Heart in 1996.

For years, it was unclear what became of Johnson’s remains. In 2002, when the historians at the New York Division of Military and Naval Affairs researched his service at the behest of his descendants (though it was later discovered they were mistaken and not actually related to Johnson), the historians determined Johnson was buried at Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors. With confirmation of the gravesite, Johnson also became eligible for and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross in 2002.

In 2015, President Barack Obama awarded him the Medal of Honor, which was accepted on Johnson’s behalf by Sergeant Major Louis Wilson of the New York National Guard. And every June 5, Albany celebrates Henry Johnson Day in acknowledgement of the day he enlisted. The city also gives out a Henry Johnson Award for Distinguished Community Service for those making contributions in the area.

Those honors joined the Croix de Guerre, which Johnson was said to have worn with humility. He sometimes needed to be prodded into discussing his act of bravery, as if it were of no major consequence. “There wasn’t anything so fine about it,” he said. “[I] just fought for my life. A rabbit would have done that.”

Joe Biden Tells Touching Story of Meeting a Navy Captain… But it Never Happened

H/T Godfather Politics.

Slow Joe The Gaff Machine Biden’s handlers better shut him up before he blows the nomination.

Old “Slow Joe” Biden is at it again, making up stories about things he never did with people he never did them with, this time it is the tear-inducing story of a Navy Captain he said he met… but it is an incident that never happened.

Biden has been on a real roll the last few weeks telling tall tales about the time he was vice president for what’s his name and inventing stories that placed him in the thick of history… even though many of these tales never happened.

This time, Joe told the moving tale of his non-existent meeting with a U.S. Navy captain.

As the Daily Wire reported:

Biden’s attempt to pin a Silver Star on his chest because his daring actions to save the soldier came too late.

But after Biden told his little tale, we all learned that it never happened.

The Washington Post reports that Biden told the story of a four-star general who asked Biden, when he was vice-president, to take a dangerous trip to Kunar province in Afghanistan so he could put the Silver Star on the chest of a Navy captain who had rappelled down a 60-foot ravine under fire and brought back the body of an American soldier.

Biden said he was warned about the danger of the trip but bravely insisted, “We can lose a vice president. We can’t lose many more of these kids. Not a joke.” Biden claimed that when he attempted to pin the medal on the Navy captain, the soldier responded, “Sir, I don’t want the damn thing! Do not pin it on me, Sir! Please, Sir. Do not do that! He died. He died!”

“This is the God’s truth. My word as a Biden,” the former VP told the crowd.

Clearly his word as a Biden is not worth much.

“Except almost every detail in the story appears to be incorrect,” the Post said

As the Washington Post explained:

Biden visited Kunar province in 2008 as a U.S. senator, not as vice president. The service member who performed the celebrated rescue that Biden described was a 20-year-old Army specialist, not a much older Navy captain. And that soldier, Kyle J. White, never had a Silver Star, or any other medal, pinned on him by Biden. At a White House ceremony six years after Biden’s visit, White stood at attention as President Barack Obama placed a Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest award for valor, around his neck.

This comes on the heels of Biden’s lie that he was vice president during the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida and that he met with the victims and their families in the White House. Only the shooting occurred a year after he left office.

Then there is this:

Matt Viser

@mviser

Joe Biden paints a vivid scene of pinning a medal on a Navy captain in Afghanistan’s Kunar province. But the tale of heroism – an emotional highlight in speeches since 2016 – seems to be an embellished jumble of several real events. From me and @GregJaffe: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/as-he-campaigns-for-president-joe-biden-tells-a-moving-but-false-war-story/2019/08/29/b5159676-c9aa-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html 

As he campaigns for president, Joe Biden tells a moving but false war story

Biden’s tale of heroism, an emotional highlight of his speeches since 2016, appears to be an embellished jumble of several real events.

washingtonpost.com

Matt Viser

@mviser

In the space of three minutes last week, Joe Biden got the time period, the location, the heroic act, the type of medal, the military branch and the rank of the recipient wrong, as well as his own role in the ceremony. From me and @GregJaffe: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/as-he-campaigns-for-president-joe-biden-tells-a-moving-but-false-war-story/2019/08/29/b5159676-c9aa-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html 

As he campaigns for president, Joe Biden tells a moving but false war story

Biden’s tale of heroism, an emotional highlight of his speeches since 2016, appears to be an embellished jumble of several real events.

washingtonpost.com

130 people are talking about this

This man clearly doesn’t even know where he is at any given time.

Democratic Party embraces nonreligious voters, criticizes ‘religious liberty’ in new resolution

H/T Fox News.

What more can DemocRats do to further alienate voters?

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) passed a resolution Saturday praising the values of “religiously unaffiliated” Americans as the “largest religious group within the Democratic Party.”

The resolution, which was unanimously passed at the DNC’s summer meeting on Aug. 24 in San Francisco, Calif., was championed by the Secular Coalition of America, an organization that lobbies on behalf of atheists, agnostics, and humanists on public policy. The group celebrated the DNC’s move as the first time a major party “embraced American nonbelievers.”

“Religiously unaffiliated Americans overwhelmingly share the Democratic Party’s values,” said the resolution, which adds they should advocate for “rational public policy based on sound science and universal humanistic values.”

Sarah Levin, director of governmental affairs for the Secular Coalition of America, praised it as a way “to ensure that policy is driven by science and evidence, not sectarian beliefs.”

The move comes as Democratic presidential candidates have ramped up their religious rhetoric on the campaign trail, but the party announced it is targeting “nonreligious voters” to try to beat President Trump, who solidified the evangelical vote in 2016.

“America was founded as a secular government charged with representing and protecting the freedoms of people of all faiths and none,” Levin added. “I am proud to see the Democratic Party take that to heart by bringing secular Americans into the fold.”

Political pundits have pointed out Democrats’ so-called God problem in the past and their efforts to solve it.

In 2012, the last election Democrats won, a headline from the convention read: “Democrats boo God.” In 2016, attendees heckled a preacher during the opening prayer. And on Saturday, Democrats took a shot at believers who use “religious liberty” to threaten the civil rights of LGBTQ Americans.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation’s co-president, Annie Laurie Gaylor, called the resolution a “political landmark” that is “long overdue.”

The Wisconsin-based FFRF “is optimistic that the DNC resolution is a sign of bigger and better things to come for freethinkers, and would like to see every party at every level of government adopt similar resolutions.”

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