Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack In Photos

H/TPearl Harbor WarBirds.

Ford-Island-Pearl-Harbor-Attack-20

Ford Island was at the center of the Pearl Harbor attack during World War II on December 7, 1941.

With dozens of long-range PBY patrol bombers on the Ford Island base and American battleships off Ford Island’s coast, it’s no wonder why the Japanese made Ford Island the focal point of their Pearl Harbor attack.

The attack destroyed nearly 300 U.S. planes, disabled the Pacific Fleet’s battleship force by damaging or destroying 18 American ships, and claimed the lives of more than 2,500 people (and wounded more than 1,000 more). The attack on Pearl Harbor, which lasted less than two hours, made it impossible for the U.S. to carry the fight to Japan to spoil the Japanese expansion in the Pacific.

Here are 36 photos and images of the Ford Island Pearl Harbor attack that occurred on 12/7/1941.

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Ford Island Pearl Harbor Attack

Today, Ford Island is still an active military base at Pearl Harbor in Oahu. Tourists can visit parts of Ford Island by visiting the Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor, which gives visitors access to historic Hangar 37 and Hangar 79.

Pearl Harbor Warbirds offers the best Hawai‘i flight adventure tours available. Be immersed in the details of the infamous attack on Pearl Harbor and soar above the important sites that played a part in the “Day of Infamy.” Relive history as you retrace the steps of the Army and Navy airmen in the days following the bombing. Fly on some of the same routes the Japanese attackers used into the airfields at Wheeler, Kāne‘ohe and Bellows. There are many air tours in Hawai‘i, but only one warbird airplane flight. Located in Honolulu, Hawai‘i Pearl Harbor Warbirds provides a personal historical experience making it one of the best O‘ahu attractions.

Experience an immersive two hour adventure that allows you to relive history as a Naval Aviator and fly Pearl Harbor like it was on December 10th, 1941. Learn more about the Admiral’s Warbird Adventure.

December 7th, 1941 The Attack on Pearl Harbor

Jim Campbell's

By Jim Campbell

December 7th, 2019

The date that will be remembered as the day that will live in infamy.

Roosevelt wanted to enter the war.

Why else would the battleships have been all situated like ducks in a row?

In contrast, over 3000 people died during the attack on the world trade center, either working there or trying to rescue those who did.

Jap Zeros had no landing gear or parachutes.

The Japanese thought of Emperor Hirito as diety, in that sense they were like today’s Muslim terrorists willing to die for Mohammed.

THE END

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Pearl Harbor is remembered

Pacific Paratrooper

Crew of the USS Arizona

When diplomacy failed and power and greed survived – the Pacific skies went dark….

Hickam Field

Aerial view during the attack

Battleship Row, as seen by Japanese pilot during the attack

From the Smithsonian Museum……

USS Oklahoma stamp

This relic marks the movements before the U.S. was launched into WWII….To record when a piece of mail was processed aboard ship, the Navy used wooden postmark stamps.  This one bears an ominous date: 6 December 1941 PM.  It was recovered from the battleship Oklahoma after it was hit by several torpedoes, listed to a 45-degree angle, capsized and sank in the attack on Pearl Harbor.  The ship lost 429 sailors and Marines; one-third of its crew.

For a different view on the Pearl Harbor “surprise”……..

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2016/12/07/the-other-pearl-harbor-story-kimmel-and-short/

For a wonderful Pearl Harbor poem, by Lee…..

https://mypoetrythatrhymes.wordpress.com/2018/08/

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Farewell Salutes – 

William Barnes – Brookston, IN ,& Lake Worth…

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12 Powerful Pearl Harbor Quotes

H/T Pearl Harbor WarBirds.

USS-Shaw-Destroyer-Pearl-Harbor-History-00

Military and political leaders from World War II relied heavily on a powerful weapon: words.

Words inspired people to join the fight, and they inspired those at home to volunteer. Here are 12 of the most powerful Pearl Harbor quotes that helped shape the course of World War II:

“Yesterday, December 7, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt on the morning after the Pearl Harbor attack

Hickam Air Force Base - Pearl Harbor WWII

“We must be the great arsenal of democracy. For us this is an emergency as serious as war itself. We must apply ourselves to our task with the same resolution, the same sense of urgency, the same spirit of patriotism and sacrifice as we would show were we at war.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt in an effort to keep the United States out of war

USS Nevada Pearl Harbor History

“No man can tame a tiger into a kitten by stroking it. There can be no appeasement with ruthlessness. There can be no reasoning with an incendiary bomb. We know now that a nation can have peace with the Nazis only at the price of total surrender.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt, on why appeasing Adolf Hitler and the Nazi government in Germany was not a rational policy.

“I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat.” – Winston Churchill, in a decisive and defiant address as the British prime minister

USS Oklahoma Battleship (BB-37) Pearl Harbor

“You ask what is our aim? I can answer in one word: Victory. Victory at all costs. Victory in spite of all terror. Victory however long and hard the road may be. For without victory there is no survival.” – Winston Churchill, in making his commitment clear to the cause

USS Shaw Destroyer Pearl Harbor

“Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, ‘This was their finest hour.’ “ – Winston Churchill, in an effort to rally the British not long after France fell to Germany

USS Oklahoma Battleship (BB-37) Pearl Harbor

“Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.” – Winston Churchill, on the sacrifices many British pilots had already made in the war

USS Utah Pearl Harbor History

“May God have mercy upon my enemies, because I won’t.” – George S. Patton, in a plainspoken address to U.S. troops

“Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force! You are about to embark upon a great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty loving people everywhere march with you.” – Dwight Eisenhower, in a message to allied forces just before they embarked on the Normandy invasion

Pearl Harbor quotes

“Before we’re through with them, the Japanese language will be spoken only in Hell.” – Vice Admiral William F. “Bull” Halsey, spoken from his flagship Enterprise upon returning to Pearl Harbor and seeing the wreckage that included his scout aircraft.

“I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve.” – attributed to Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto

“There’s nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer.” – Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle

USS Oklahoma Battleship (BB-37) Pearl Harbor

Pearl Harbor Warbirds offers the best Hawai‘i flight adventure tours available. Be immersed in the details of the infamous attack on Pearl Harbor and soar above the important sites that played a part in the “Day of Infamy.” Relive history as you retrace the steps of the Army and Navy airmen in the days following the bombing. Fly on some of the same routes the Japanese attackers used into the airfields at Wheeler, Kāne‘ohe and Bellows. There are many air tours in Hawai‘i, but only one warbird airplane flight. Located in Honolulu, Hawai‘i Pearl Harbor Warbirds provides a personal historical experience making it one of the best O‘ahu attractions.

Experience an immersive two hour adventure that allows you to relive history as a Naval Aviator and fly Pearl Harbor like it was on December 10th, 1941. Learn more about the Admiral’s Warbird Adventure.

World War II – Attack on Pearl Harbor. Watch Full Documentary in Color

Watch Full Documentary in Color: World War II – Attack on Pearl Harbor. The attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise military strike conducted by the Imperial Japanese Navy against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, in the United States Territory of Hawaii, on the morning of December 7, 1941 (December 8 in Japan). The attack led to the United States’ entry into World War II.

Pearl Harbor: 16 Days To Die – Three Sailors trapped in the USS West Virginia

H/T War History OnLine.

I can not imagine what was going through theses three sailors’ minds.

I can not imagine the helplessness these men’s comrades felt knowing they can not rescue their comrades.

The sunken battleship USS West Virginia (BB-48) at Pearl Harbor after her fires were out, possibly on 8 December 1941. USS Tennessee (BB-43) is inboard. A Vought OS2U Kingfisher floatplane (marked "4-O-3") is upside down on West Virginia's main deck. A second OS2U is partially burned out atop the Turret No. 3 catapult. Note the CXAM radar antenna atop West Virginia´s foremast.
The sunken battleship USS West Virginia (BB-48) at Pearl Harbor after her fires were out, possibly on 8 December 1941. USS Tennessee (BB-43) is inboard. A Vought OS2U Kingfisher floatplane (marked “4-O-3”) is upside down on West Virginia’s main deck. A second OS2U is partially burned out atop the Turret No. 3 catapult. 

In the aftermath of the attacks on Pearl Harbour during World War Two stories emerged of sailors who were trapped in the sunken battleships, some even survived for weeks.

Those who were trapped underwater banged continuously on the side of the ship so that anyone would hear them and come to their rescue. When the noises were first heard many thought it was just loose wreckage or part of the clean-up operation for the destroyed harbour.

However the day after the attack, crewmen realised that there was an eerie banging noise coming from the foward hull of the USS West Virginia, which had sunk in the harbour.

It didn’t take long for the crew and Marines based at the harbour to realise that there was nothing they could do. They could not get to these trapped sailors in time. Months later rescue and salvage men who raised the USS West Virginia found the bodies of three men who had found an airlock in a storeroom but had eventually run out of air.

They were Ronald Endicott, 18, Clifford Olds, 20, and Louis Costin, 21. Within the storeroom was a calendar and they had crossed off every day that they had been alive – 16 days had been crossed off using a red pencil. The men would have been below deck when the attack happened, so it is unlikely that they knew what was happening.

Those who survived the attack and were crew on the USS West Virginia have remembered the story and retold it quietly as a story of bravery and determination of the young soldiers.

In truth, the US Navy had never told their families how long the three men had survived for, instead telling them that they had been killed in the attack on the harbour. Their brothers and sisters eventually discovered the truth but were so saddened that they did not speak of it.

One of Clifford’s friends and comrades Jack Miller often returned to the harbour and would pray for his friend at the site of the sunken wreck. He says that just the night before the attack they had been drinking beer together, and he had wanted to rescue him desperately in the days after the attack.

However there was no way of any rescue crews getting to them since if they cut a hole in the ship, it would flood it, and if they tried to use a blowtorch it could explode since there was too much oil and gasoline in the water.

Survivors say that no one wanted to go on guard duty anywhere near the USS West Virginia since they would hear the banging of trapped survivors all night long, but with nothing that could be done.

Admiral Yamamoto, The Architect Of The Sneak Attack On Pearl Harbor

H/T War History OnLine.

Japan would never invade the United States. We would find a rifle behind every blade of grass.” Isoroku Yamamoto.

The man who planned the attack on Pearl Harbor, Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, was an unusual and contradictory figure. A man with peaceful international connections around the world, he would lead his country’s navy in a war he did not believe in, trying to win a conflict he expected to lose. Though a senior figure who was not fighting on the front line, he would die in military action, as the tide of war hung in the balance.

1. An International Figure

Born in 1884, Isoroku Yamamoto became a career naval officer. He graduated from the Imperial Japanese Naval Academy at the age of twenty, was wounded at the Battle of Tsushima in the Russo-Japanese War, returned to training at the Naval Staff College, and emerged as a Lieutenant Commander in 1916.

The Japanese naval establishment was less aggressive than that of the army, and Yamamoto was an advocate of gunboat diplomacy over actual war.

This was particularly true in relation to the United States, a country he knew well. He studied at Harvard from 1919 to 1921, was twice the naval attaché to Washington, and while in the US took the time to study its business practices and customs. He accompanied diplomats to naval conferences in 1930 and 1934, providing military insight into talks about arms limitation.

Isoroku Yamamoto
Isoroku Yamamoto

2. Naval Innovations

Initially a gunnery specialist, in 1924 Yamamoto changed his focus to naval aviation. Aerial combat had only been a feature of warfare for a decade, since the First World War had pushed the European powers into finding ways to fight with aircraft. Yamamoto was therefore at the cutting edge of military thinking, dealing with techniques and technologies that would be vital to the very different naval combat of World War Two.

First as head of the Aeronautics Department and then as commander of the First Carrier Division, Yamamoto gained extensive experience in his field. He pushed for innovations in naval aeronautics, such as a focus on long-range bombers operating from land against enemy fleets. This led to the adoption of land-based bombers equipped with torpedoes, and long-range aircraft such as the Mitsubishi G3M and G4M medium bombers, which could fly great distances but at the price of fragile, vulnerable frames.

Yamamoto at Tokyo Station enroute to take command of the Combined Fleet on August 31, 1939.
Yamamoto at Tokyo Station enroute to take command of the Combined Fleet on August 31, 1939

 

Made into an admiral and commander in chief of the navy, Yamamoto brought innovative approaches to the way existing forces were fielded. Gathering Japan’s six largest aircraft carriers into the single First Air Fleet, he provided the Japanese navy with a force of incredible striking capacity. The downside of this was that it put all Japan’s best eggs in one basket, making her best carriers vulnerable to being taken out in a single successful attack.

3. Opposition to War

As Yamamoto made his changes, Japan was heading towards war. The army was generally more belligerent than the navy, and Yamamoto fitted this picture, opposing the army’s grandiose plans not only to conquer East Asia, but to take on the United States of America.

Yamamoto’s opposition was not based on principles. For all that he admired things about the US, he was a military man and a loyal supporter of Japanese power. He opposed the war because he did not believe Japan could win it. He believed that America was too vast and powerful for Japan to conquer and that without conquering them Japan would not be able to defeat the Americans.

By the time he was proven right, Yamamoto would be dead and his country ruined.

4. The Reluctant Planner

Yamamoto with staff on Nagato sometime in 1940.
Yamamoto with staff on Nagato sometime in 1940.

“If I am told to fight regardless of the consequences, I shall run wild for the first six months or a year, but I have absolutely no confidence about the second and third years.”

– Admiral Yamamoto

Unfortunately for all involved, the pro-war faction gained control of the Japanese government. They were determined to break American influence in the region and dominate it themselves. They believed that through a fast offensive they could seize the oilfields and the other raw resources they needed to support the war, and so emerge victorious beyond that first year.

Though he still expected disaster, as a loyal officer Yamamoto bowed to the will of his superiors. He was now faced with the unenviable task of planning the initial knockout blow meant to win that first stage of the war. And so he worked to the best of his ability in planning the attack on the American naval base at Pearl Harbor. This surprise attack with aircraft and midget submarines was meant to destroy the American carrier fleet, crippling Japan’s opponent before the war really began.

The attack on 7 December 1941 was only a partial success. The American fleet suffered great damage but was far from taken out. The Americans were enraged by the attack and launched themselves into the war with total commitment and with great determination.

5. After Pearl Harbor

Yamamoto at Rabaul with Jinichi Kusaka in April 1943.
Yamamoto at Rabaul with Jinichi Kusaka in April 1943.

Initial Japanese successes at sea did not lead to American negotiating an end to the war, as Yamamoto and others had optimistically hoped. As the Japanese high command grappled over the decision of what to do next, Yamamoto went back and forth in backing others, until he was able to gain support for his own plan to advance on Midway.

The resulting Battle of Midway was a significant defeat for the Japanese and a turning point in the war.

6. Death in Action

The crashed remains of Yamamoto's Mitsubishi "Betty" bomber in the jungles of Bougainville.
The crashed remains of Yamamoto’s Mitsubishi “Betty” bomber in the jungles of Bougainville.

Following Midway, the Japanese lost the momentum of their initial successes. Yamamoto kept them pushing against the Allies, and Japanese resources, in particular the supply of planes on which his plans were so reliant, started to become scarce. In the longer war of attrition, American industry showed its strength.

In April 1943, following a further significant defeat at Guadalcanal, Yamamoto undertook an inspection tour in the south Pacific to help raise morale among forces there. The Americans got word of his location and, on direct orders from President Roosevelt, ambushed Yamamoto’s transport plane on 18 April. Yamamoto and those traveling with him were killed.

He died in a war he opposed, still trying to win it to the end.