21 Things You May Not Know About the U.S. Constitution

H/T Mental Floss.

Some Constitutional Trivia.

The Constitution of the United States is only 4543 words—7762 if you count the Amendments—and originally fit on just four large sheets of paper. But it packs a wallop. Not only is it the oldest written national constitution in the world, it’s arguably the most influential in the world, too.

1. MAKING THE CONSTITUTION WAS A SWEATY, SMELLY AFFAIR.

Independence Hall

ERIC BARADAT, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

The Constitution was drafted in Philadelphia in 1787 over the course of a humid summer. The windows of Independence Hall were shut to discourage eavesdroppers, and many delegates, who were mostly from out of town, wore and re-wore the same thick woolen garments day after day. Many framers stayed at the same boarding houses and shared rooms that, we can only imagine, reeked with a distinct eau du freedom.

2. THE INTENT WAS NOT TO CREATE A NEW CONSTITUTION.

Articles of Confederation

THE U.S. NATIONAL ARCHIVES (ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION), WIKIMEDIA COMMONS // PUBLIC DOMAIN

The delegates didn’t come to Philadelphia intending to write a new constitution—they came to tweak the Articles of Confederation, the original constitution written in 1777 (and later ratified in 1781). But after some deliberation, the attendees realized that the Articles were a mess and needed to be scrapped. One of the primary motivations for starting from scratch was money: At the time, the central government was mired in debt from the Revolutionary War. While the federal government could request money from the states, states were under no obligation to pay. A new constitution could change this.

3. SOME FRAMERS WANTED TO LIMIT THE SIZE OF THE ARMY.

Continental Army

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According to Jonathan Elliot’s Debates, Elbridge Gerry was concerned that “there was no check here against standing armies in time of peace” and proposed that “there should not be kept up in time of peace more than __ thousand troops” (with Elliot saying Gerry wanted the blank filled with two or three). According to ConstitutionFacts [PDF], “George Washington sarcastically agreed with this proposal as long as a stipulation was added that no invading army could number more than 3000 troops!”

4. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HAD TO BE CARRIED TO THE CONVENTION.

Franklin's Sedan Chair

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At the time, an 81-year-old Benjamin Franklin was in awful pain. He had gout and could barely stand. Instead of walking, he arrived at Independence Hall on at least the first couple of days carried by four prisoners from the Walnut Street jail, who ferried him around the city in a sedan chair.

5. AMERICA’S FARMERS WERE WOEFULLY MISREPRESENTED.

Painting of a farmer

WINSLOW HOMER, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS // PUBLIC DOMAIN

Of the 55 delegates who attended the Constitutional Convention, 34 were lawyers. Nearly all of them had previously held some kind of public office. This, of course, did not reflect the American electorate, a country of farmers: While 22 out of the 55 derived the majority of their income from farming, only one delegate, Georgia’s William Few, in any way represented farmer’s interests, having been born into a yeoman farming family. But even Few was a lawyer and politician by this time.

6. THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE MAY HAVE BEEN JUST AS CONTROVERSIAL THEN AS IT IS NOW.

Drawing of the Electoral College

The Electoral Commission holding a secret session by candle-light, on the Louisiana question, February 16th
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

It took 60 separate ballots for the delegates to finally accept the Electoral College. Proponents believed it was the best compromise between those who wanted to choose the president via direct popular vote and those who wanted a Congressional vote. Since then, there have been more than 500 propositions to reform or eliminate the Electoral College.

7. WRITING IT COST $30.

Constitution Scroll

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You know names like George Washington and Benjamin Franklin, but let’s give credit to two lesser known—but equally important—figures: Gouverneur Morris I, who wrote the Preamble to the Constitution and is responsible for much of the document’s wording; and Jacob Shallus, the Pennsylvania General Assembly assistant clerk who actually held the pen. (Shallus was paid $30—about $900 today—for lending his penmanship.)

8. IT’S RIDDLED WITH PECULIAR SPELLINGS.

Constitution being rolled out on the steps

CHIP SOMODEVILLA, GETTY IMAGES

When the Constitution was written, English spellings had not yet been standardized. As a result, the document contains odd spellings, British spellings, and peculiar words that might look odd today but were acceptable at the time. In the list of signatories, the word Pennsylvania is missing an “n.” In Article 1 Section 10, there’s an errant apostrophe attached to what should be its. There are spellings such as defence or labour and even “chuse” for choose.

9. NOT EVERY FOUNDING FATHER SIGNED IT.

portrait of Patrick Henry

HULTON ARCHIVE, GETTY IMAGES

Thomas Jefferson never signed the Constitution because he was busy serving as the Minister to France in Paris. John Adams, who was serving as Minister to Great Britain, never signed it either. A handful of founding fathers, such as George Mason, Elbridge Gerry, and Edmund Randolph were present for the signing but refused to touch the document. Others such as Samuel Adams, Patrick Henry, and John Hancock—whose signature was such a standout on the Declaration of Independence—simply did not attend. (When Henry was asked why he declined to attend the convention, he supposedly said, “I smelt a rat.”)

10. RHODE ISLAND HATED THE CONSTITUTION SO MUCH IT ALMOST STARTED A CIVIL WAR.

Rhode Island Revolution Memorial

EVA HAMBACH, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Eleven of 13 states ratified the Constitution in the months after signing, and North Carolina finally signed in November 1789. That left Rhode Island—which never sent a delegate to the Constitutional Convention—as the last holdout. The state opposed a strong central government and had to make 11 attempts to ratify the Constitution. (Some votes weren’t even close: One popular referendum finished with 237 votes “for” and 2945 votes “against.”) The vitriol was so intense that, when a group of Rhode Island federalists began planning an ox roast to celebrate the document in 1788, an army of 1000 angry armed men assembled to stop it. The event nearly sparked a civil war.

11. THE FIRST AMENDMENT WAS ORIGINALLY THIRD.

Bill of Rights

THE U.S. NATIONAL ARCHIVES (THE U.S. BILL OF RIGHTS), WIKIMEDIA COMMONS // PUBLIC DOMAIN

When the Bill of Rights was drafted, James Madison proposed 19 amendments (the House sent 17 of them to the Senate, which were consolidated into the 12 amendments that went to the states). The first two, however, were not ratified immediately. The first amendment set “out a detailed formula for the number of House members, based on each decennial census,” writes Andrew Glass at Politico. “Scholars have calculated that had the amendment, which is still pending, been adopted, today’s House would have either 800 or 5000 representatives.” (It currently has 435.) The second amendment regulated Congressional compensation. That amendment was not ratified for another 203 years: Originally the second, it became the 27th amendment.

12. THE FIRST NATIONAL THANKSGIVING WAS ESTABLISHED LARGELY TO THANK GOD FOR THE NEW CONSTITUTION.

Washington Thanksgiving Proclamation

TIMOTHY CLARY, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

In 1789, President George Washington issued a proclamation calling for “a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.” The date was set for Thursday, November 26, 1789.

13. FOR DECADES, IT WAS UNCLEAR IF THE VICE PRESIDENT WAS SUPPOSED TO SUCCEED THE PRESIDENT.

portrait of John Tyler

NATIONAL ARCHIVES, NEWSMAKERS/GETTY IMAGES

According to Article II, Section 1: “In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers and duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice President.” While this section states that the Vice President inherits the powers and duties of the presidency, it does not state that he or she should assume the office of the presidency itself (one 19th century Senator made the analogy “If a colonel was shot in battle, the next officer in rank took command of the regiment, but he did not thereby become a colonel”). But when President William Henry Harrison became the first president to die while in office in 1841, Vice President John Tyler began referring to himself as the President, and the convention stuck. However, this succession wasn’t made official until 1967 when the 25th Amendmentwas ratified.

14. THE 25TH AMENDMENT HAS BEEN INVOKED THREE(ISH) TIMES (ALL FOR COLON TREATMENTS).

George W. Bush leaves for Colonoscopy

STEFAN ZAKLIN, GETTY IMAGES

Section 3 of the 25th Amendment allows the President to hand power over to the Vice President if he feels “unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.” President George W. Bush invoked the amendment twice—making Dick Cheney “Acting President”—while he was undergoing colonoscopies.

But when President Ronald Reagan had polyps removed from his colon in 1985, he and his legal team were unclear about the amendment’s “application to such brief and temporary periods of incapacity” and did not officially invoke it. However, his staff still followed all the rules precisely in order to temporarily hand his duties to George H.W. Bush, meaning most agree that he did essentially invoke Section 3.

15. THE CONSTITUTION PROHIBITS STATES FROM CHANGING THE STRUCTURE OF THEIR GOVERNMENT.

Colorful map of the U.S.A.

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According to Article IV, Section 4, also called the Guarantee Clause, the “United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government.” In other words, if a state ever attempted to radically change its structure of government—if Vermont wanted to become a monarchy, or if Oklahoma decided to give feudalism a test drive, or if Delaware changed to a full-blown dictatorship—these changes would be considered unconstitutional.

16. THE 13TH AMENDMENT HAS A CONTROVERSIAL CLAUSE.

Prison Laborer mowing a lawn

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The 13th amendment, ratified after the Civil War in 1865, states that “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States.” This middle clause has stoked controversy. Currently, the average daily minimum wage of an incarcerated worker is $0.86. Some states pay prisoners nothing at all for non-industry work.

17. YOU DON’T ALWAYS KNOW HOW YOUR CONGRESSPERSON VOTES.

Congress in session

ALEX WONG, GETTY IMAGES

According to Article I, Section 5, a roll call vote needs to happen when only one-fifth of those present for the vote request it (a roll call vote records each congressperson’s name and vote, while a voice vote does not record names or number of votes). True anonymous voting, of course, is very rare, and common practice is for politicians to keep their constituents informed on their voting record.

18. THANKS TO THE CONSTITUTION, YOU COULD BECOME A STATE-SANCTIONED PIRATE.

Pirate Ship on the ocean

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Article I, Section 8 gives the government the authority “to define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas.” It also allows the government to grant letters of marque—that is, to grant people permission to become privateers. Such a license could allow you to capture, steal, or spy on ships of America’s foreign enemies! (Unfortunately, the fantastic rumor that the Goodyear Blimp received a letter of marque during World War II to hunt Japanese submarines off California is not true.)

19. MUCH OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS DIDN’T APPLY TO THE STATES UNTIL THE MID-20TH CENTURY.

First Amendment engraved on a stone

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When the Bill of Rights was adopted, it only applied to the federal government. The part of the Fifth Amendment, for example, which prevents the federal government from convicting a person twice for the same crime (what’s called double jeopardy), was only enforceable in some states until 1969. As Richard Labunski writes in the Chicago Tribune, it took a long time for nearly every other amendment to apply to states: “freedom of speech (1925), freedom of the press (1931), freedom of religion (1947) … the right to a jury trial (1968) … and prohibition against excessive bail (1971).”

20. THE CONSTITUTION SUPPOSEDLY CONTAINS A LOOPHOLE THAT COULD ALLOW A DICTATORSHIP TO FLOURISH.

Democracy/Dictatorship Street Sign

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In the 1940s, European intellectuals fled Europe for America. Kurt Gödel, an Austrian philosopher, was among the refugees. During Gödel’s citizenship interview, he casually mentioned to the immigration official that he had discovered a loophole in the Constitution that could open a pathway for a dictator. However, he never explained what that pathway was. (Some believe that Gödel’s loophole has something to do with Article V, which lays out how the Constitution can be amended. Technically, if Article V was used on itself—that is, if it were amended to make changing the Constitution easier—the entire document could be easily rewritten.)

21. THE CHANCE OF AN AMENDMENT PASSING IS BASICALLY ZERO.

Amending an Amendment

NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS // PUBLIC DOMAIN

The chance of Article V being changed, however, is slim. Over the past two centuries, more than 11,600 amendments to the Constitution have been proposed. Of those, only 33 have been sent to the states for ratification. Of those, only 27 have been approved. Rounded down, the percent chance of getting an amendment passed is, in fact, zero.

15 U.S. Town and City Names With Unusual Backstories

H/T Mental Floss.

As Paul Harvey used to say “Now You Know The Rest Of The Stroy.”

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MICHAEL SWIGART, FLICKR // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

While many towns and cities in the United States were named after historical figures or nearby topographical features, some monikers have origin stories that are a little more unusual. Here are 15 names with backstories that range from the curious to the downright bizarre.

1. TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES, NEW MEXICO

Originally named Hot Springs, this New Mexico spa town changed its name to Truth or Consequences on March 31, 1950, in reference to the popular game show of the same name. Host Ralph Edwards had promised to host the show in the first town that changed its name to Truth or Consequences. Hot Springs obliged, and Ralph Edwards kept his promise. But rather than change their name back to Hot Springs once the novelty wore off, residents voted to make the name permanent in 1967.

2. ZILWAUKEE, MICHIGAN

An exit sign for Zilwaukee, Michigan

KEN LUND, FLICKR // CC BY-SA 2.0

If you noticed that the name Zilwaukee sounds a little bit like Milwaukee, that’s no coincidence. Zilwaukee, Michigan wasn’t just named after Milwaukee as a tribute to the Wisconsin city, but to trick potential settlers who were interested in moving to Milwaukee. Started in 1848 by New Yorkers Daniel and Solomon Johnson, the settlement initially consisted of little more than a few houses and a sawmill. In need of workers, the Johnson brothers decided the best way to attract settlers was through deceit. They named their little riverside settlement “Zilwaukie” (later changed to Zilwaukee) and waited for settlers to start pouring in. It’s unclear whether their plan was successful; settlers did eventually arrive, though it may have been the general desire for work (the founding of the town happened to coincide with an influx of German immigrants), rather than the Johnson brothers’ clever scheme, that attracted the town’s residents.

3. PORTLAND, OREGON

If not for a momentous coin toss, Portland could have been named Boston. Founded by Massachusetts-born lawyer Asa Lovejoy and Maine-born Francis Pettygrove, the 640-acre site that would become Portland was originally known only as “The Clearing.” When it came time to give the town a real name, Lovejoy and Pettygrove began to argue. While Pettygrove insisted the town be named Portland after the city in Maine, Lovejoy wanted to name the settlement for his hometown, Boston. In order to settle the dispute, the two founders decided to flip a coin. Winning two out of three tosses, Pettygrove got his way, and gave Portland its name.

4. EGG HARBOR, WISCONSIN

While there are a few theories regarding Egg Harbor’s origins, one of the most popular (and well-documented) centers on the great battle that took place just offshore in 1825. According to an 1862 recounting, a group of traders traveling in a handful of small boats to Mackinac Island decided to take shelter in an unnamed harbor overnight. As they paddled toward shore, a friendly race broke out, with each boat trying to overtake its neighbor. In order to slow each other’s progress, the traders began tossing bits of hardtack (a type of biscuit or cracker) at each other. But they soon realized they might need the hardtack later, and so they started throwing eggs. According to one witness, the fighting didn’t stop once the traders reached shore. Instead, they repeated their egg fight on land, stopping only once they ran out of eggs, and had “laughed until exhaustion.” The next day, speeches were made commemorating the great egg battle, and Egg Harbor was given its name.

5. NAGS HEAD, NORTH CAROLINA

Some believe Nags Head was named for one of the several towns of that name on the English coast. Others, however, believe Nags Head has a more nefarious backstory. According to legend, recounted in the 19th century by Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, pirates once used the beach at Nags Head to lure in their prey. They’d attach a lamp to the neck of an old horse (or nag), which would slowly walk the beach at night. Mistaking the nag’s lantern for the lights of another boat, ships would sail toward the light, grounding themselves in the shallow waters near the beach and making themselves a perfect target for pirates.

6. BASTROP, LOUISIANA & BASTROP, TEXAS

A sign in Bastrop, Texas

WIL C. FRY, FLICKR // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Another town name with a criminal backstory is Bastrop. The two towns with the same title in Louisiana and Texas were named for Dutch nobleman Felipe Enrique Neri, the Baron de Bastrop, who played an important role in settling the future Lone Star State. Only it turns out the Baron de Bastrop wasn’t a baron at all: Historians now believe the self-proclaimed Dutch nobleman was actually one Philip Hendrick Nering Bögel, a former tax collector who left Holland after being accused of embezzlement. Bogel fled to America with a 1000 gold ducat price on his head and reestablished himself as a Dutch nobleman. He went on to help establish several Anglo-American colonies in Texas, and even acted as a representative to the state of Coahuila and Texas in the 1820s.

7. MODESTO, CALIFORNIA

From towns and cities, right down to buildings and park benches, people seem to love naming landmarks after themselves; it’s the nature of the human ego. Which is why the story behind Modesto, California’s name is particularly surprising. Founded in 1870 and incorporated in 1884, Modesto was the last stop on the Central Pacific Railroad line. Town residents decided that they wanted to name their new town after financier William Chapman Ralston, to honor the man who brought them the railroad and connected them to the rest of the country. But Ralston was too humble, and asked the town to find a more suitable namesake. Instead, residents decided to call their town Modesto, in honor of Ralston’s modesty.

8. CHICKEN, ALASKA

A town sign in Chicken, Alaska

J. STEPHEN CONN, FLICKR / CC BY-NC 2.0

Originally a mining town, Chicken got its unusual name from a group of gold miners who weren’t great at spelling. The miners wanted to call the town Ptarmigan, after the grouse-like bird that inhabited the area, but couldn’t figure out how to spell the word. So they settled on naming the town for an easier-to-spell bird: the chicken.

9. FROG EYE, ALABAMA

According to legend, Frog Eye was named after a ceramic frog. During the prohibition era, the proprietor of a local saloon kept the little frog sculpture in his shop window at all times: When police officers were in the bar, he’d close one of the frog’s eyes so that customers would know not to order illegal liquor.

10. HOT COFFEE, MISSISSIPPI

A sign in Hot Coffee, Mississippi

JIMMY EMERSON DVM, FLICKR // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The Mississippi community known as Hot Coffee was, you guessed it, named for its damn fine cup of coffee. According to a WPA history of Mississippi written during the Great Depression, a Civil War veteran named J.J. Davis built a store at the intersection of two major thoroughfares in Mississippi, hoping to attract travelers. “He hung a coffee pot over his door, and served coffee that was both hot and good, made of pure spring water and New Orleans beans,” explains the WPA historian. “He used molasses drippings for sugar and the customer could have either long or short sweetening; he refused to serve cream, saying it ruined the taste.” The 19th-century coffee connoisseur soon developed a reputation for his superior beans, and both travelers and local politicians would frequent his shop. According to legend, Davis started calling the community Hot Coffee after a traveling salesman burnt his mouth trying to drink Davis’s coffee too quickly, calling out, “Mister, this is hot coffee!”

11. SLAUGHTER BEACH, DELAWARE

There’s some debate as to how Slaughter Beach got its name. While some believe the bayside community was named for local postmaster William Slaughter, others claim it was named after the hordes of horseshoe crabs that lay their eggs on the beach of the Delaware Bay each spring. Because of unpredictable tides, the horseshoe crabs often ended up stranded on the beach, at the mercy of predatory animals like foxes and raccoons—which resulted in something of an annual horseshoe crab slaughter.

12. KITTS HUMMOCK, DELAWARE

According to local legend, the little Delaware community now known as Kitts Hummock was originally named Kidd’s Hammock, after Captain William Kidd. The notorious pirate terrorized America’s east coast during the 17th century, and though there is little historical information to tie him specifically to the community of Kitts Hummock, legends of Kidd’s treasure buried somewhere in Delaware persist to this day.

13. TELEPHONE, TEXAS

Back in the 1880s, having a telephone was a really big deal. Such a big deal, in fact, that one Texas community decided it was worth naming their town after. According to the Texas State Historical Association, the tiny community of Telephone was established in 1886. General store owner Pete Hindman submitted a series of town names to postal authorities, but all were already in use. Frustrated, Hindman submitted the name Telephone, in reference to the fact that the only telephone in the area was in his store.

14. TIGHTWAD, MISSOURI

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According to Tightwad residents, the little Missouri town’s name dates back to the early 20th century, when the local mailman asked the local grocer to set aside a watermelon for him while he made his rounds. The postman came back after delivering the community’s mail only to find that the grocer had sold the watermelon to a customer who had agreed to pay 50 cents more. The postman accused the grocer of being a tightwad, and apparently the rest of the community agreed, and even embraced the accusation. They unofficially called the little community Tightwad until the village was incorporated in the 1980s, making the title official.

15. JIM THORPE, PENNSYLVANIA

Originally two towns called Mauch Chunk and East Mauch Chunk, this Pennsylvania town became one and changed its name to Jim Thorpe after the legendary turn-of-the-century Olympic athlete, baseball player, and football star in the 1950s. The two towns didn’t have any pre-existing connection to Thorpe, who was from Oklahoma and had played for Milwaukee and New York teams. Rather, after Thorpe’s death, his third wife made a deal with them. Mauch Chunk and East Mauch Chunk were looking for a way to promote tourism; at the same time, Thorpe’s wife wanted what she considered a proper memorial for her husband, so she essentially sold the towns on rebranding themselves as Jim Thorpe. The towns merged, bought Thorpe’s remains from his widow, built him a monument, and became Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania. Two of Jim Thorpe’s sons then fought a legal battle to have his remains returned to Oklahoma, but in October 2015 the Supreme Court declined to hear the case, leaving in place the appeals court ruling in favor of the town.

A version of this story originally ran in 2016.

Gil Cisneros Accuser, a Democrat, Sticks to Her Story

H/T Breitbart California.

Where is the wall to wall coverage of the Gil Cisnero’s accuser?

Oh silly me Gil Cisnero is a Dippycrap being accused by a Dipyyycrap and Brett Kavanaugh is a Republican being accused by a Dippycrap.

The woman who accused Democrat Gil Cisneros of sexual misconduct earlier this year is sticking to her story, according to the Wall Street Journal, which profiled Cisneros’ race against Republican Young Kim for the open seat in California’s 39th congressional district.

Melissa Fazli, a fellow Democrat, accused Cisneros of propositioning her at a party convention, ostensibly in exchange for a political donation.

The Journal interviewed Fazli, who stuck to her story despite denials by Cisneros and his staff:

A new dynamic entered the race this summer when the Congressional Leadership Fund, a super PAC aligned with House Speaker Paul Ryan (R., Wis.) began running ads against Mr. Cisneros accusing him of sexual harassment.

The ads refer to Melissa Fazli, a Democrat who ran for the state Assembly this year, and said she had asked Mr. Cisneros for a campaign donation at a San Diego hotel around 11:15 p.m. on Feb. 24. She alleged that Mr. Cisneros, who appeared intoxicated, “out of the blue” asked if they should go back to her room.

Mr. Cisneros’s campaign denies her allegations. The candidate’s policy director, Tom Rivera, said he was with Mr. Cisneros all night and saw Ms. Fazli ask for a donation around 10 p.m., which Mr. Cisneros declined.

“Gil was not intoxicated, nor did he make any suggestive joke or ask,” Mr. Rivera said in a statement. The campaign supplied statements from other local officials and a local reporter saying that Mr. Cisneros appeared sober that night.

Ms. Fazli said Mr. Rivera wasn’t present for their interaction. “If he wasn’t drunk, I feel even more violated,” she said in an interview.

“Gil Cisnero’s attempts to discredit his accuser include relying on his paid staffer as a witness,” Courtney Alexander, a spokeswoman for the Congressional Leadership Fund said.

Former President Barack Obama campaigned with Cisneros last weekend despite the allegations. The 39th district seat is being vacated by retiring Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA).

 

North Carolina Chick-Fil-A Opens on Sunday to Feed Florence Evacuees

H/T Breitbart’s Big Government.

Imagine that these evil Christians stepping up to help their community.

A North Carolina Chick-fil-A location broke company tradition and opened its doors on Sunday to help feed people after Hurricane Florence pummeled the Carolinas.

Donovan and Nikki Carless, who own a Chick-fil-A in Garner, had been monitoring the storm and wondered what they could do to help, WTVD reported.

When they realized they could help the relief efforts with food—the owners sprung into action.

Local Area: is Your Car over 3 Years Old? You’ll Wish You Knew This Earlier
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Donovan brought up the idea with his team members, who said they were excited to get to work. The Garner Chick-fil-A worked with the American Red Cross to provide 1,200 nuggets and 500 sandwiches to evacuees at three shelters.

Nikki and Donovan personally delivered the 1,200 nuggets to a shelter set up inside an old Kmart in Garner.

Chick-fil-A stores are usually closed on Sundays to uphold a tradition started in 1946 by the company’s Christian founder, Truett Cathy, to recognize the day as a holy day and give employees one scheduled day off per week.

But Chick-fil-A locations across the country have opened on Sunday to assist those in times of disaster. A Colorado Chick-fil-A location opened on a Sunday in December 2017 to feed first responders after several law enforcement officers died in a shooting.

In the same month, an Atlanta Chick-Fil-A opened on Sunday after thousands of passengers at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport found themselves stranded because of a power outage at the airport.

Kavanaugh’s #MeToo Accuser FINALLY Speaks Out

H/T Right Wing Folks.

I am calling bullshit on this woman and her story.

Kavanaugh’s super-top-secret accuser is speaking out.

And saying Kavanaugh could have KILLED HER.

Yes… seriously.

According to this:

Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who wrote the letter accusing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is going public with her story, saying she thought he might kill her.

‘I thought he might inadvertently kill me,’ said Ford, now a 51-year-old research psychologist in northern California, to The Washington Post. ‘He was trying to attack me and remove my clothing.’

Ford said she was able to escape when Kavanaugh’s classmate at Georgetown Preparatory School, Mark Judge, jumped on top of them and sent them tumbling.

I’m sorry… what?

This woman FEARED FOR HER LIFE… and then conveniently kept that to herself until right before Brett Kavanaugh is set to be confirmed as a Supreme Court judge?

Why am I having such a hard time with this?

She describes the “attack”

Ford described the attack as taking place during the summer in the early 1980s, when Kavanaugh and a friend — both ‘stumbling drunk,’ Ford charges — corralled her into a bedroom during a gathering of teenagers at a house in Montgomery County.

In her first public comments on the incident, which came to light last week after Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Dianne Feinstein referred a ‘letter’ describing a sexual assault to the FBI, she described what happened when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.

While his friend watched, Ford recounts to The Post, Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed on her back and groped her over her clothes, grinding against and attempting to pull off her one-piece bathing suit and the clothing she wore over it.

She said she tried to scream and he put his hand over her mouth.

Those are pretty gross charges.

Definitely more than what was previously being reported.

But the timing of this is all so suspect. The “Resistance” is literally SCREAMING that Kavanaugh is going to KILL ALL WOMEN AND CHILDREN… and then this woman comes out with a story that supposedly happened ten years before I WAS EVEN BORN?!

Right NOW?

Why am I supposed to believe that she held on to this all this time? Kavanaugh has previously gone through confirmation hearings. She could have spoken out then. But NO. She spoke out when hysteria is at its all-time PEAK.

It seems oddly convenient. For the record, she’s a registered Democrat.

Not that it should matter.

Kavanaugh has denied the charges.

He told The New Yorker: ‘I categorically and unequivocally deny this allegation. I did not do this back in high school or at any time.’

And that classmate who supposedly “saved her?”

The classmate said of the allegation, ‘I have no recollection of that.’

Sixty-five of Kavanaugh’s female classmates, however, have all signed a letter in support of his character:

In response, the  Senate Judiciary Committee released a letter signed by 65 women in support of Kavanaugh. They’ve known him for over 35 years and say he’s always treated women “honorably.”

“For the entire time we have known Brett Kavanaugh, he has behaved honorably and treated women with respect,” the women wrote. “We strongly believe it is important to convey this information to the committee at this time.”

“Through the more than 35 years we have known him, Brett has stood out for his friendship, character, and integrity,” they continued. “In particular, he has always treated women with decency and respect. That was true when he was in high school, and it has remained true to this day.”

ClashQuiz: Guess How MUCH Socialist Ocasio-Cortez’ Outfit Cost – $49? $180? $3,500?

H/T Clash Daily.

The hypocrisy is really thick.

If NYT weren’t so busy reporting misleading stories about Nikki Haley’s curtains, maybe they would pick up on the hypocrisy of the budding Democrat Socialist Superstar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

The New York Times, with their usual smug satisfaction, thought they’d scored with a ‘gotcha’ story implicating our take-no-prisoners Ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley. We’ll have more to say about that at the end of this piece, but the takeaway from their article is that its fair game to judge a person’s character by their personal excesses.

I wonder if that same rule holds true for judging an avowed Socialist. (Sorry, that’s supposed to be ‘Democratic’ Socialist, as though that changes anything one iota.)

The Democrats’ budding new hard-left star met with some construction workers to show that she truly isn’t out-of-touch with the common man. Here’s Alexandria’s photo op:

The outfit Ocasio-Cortez is sporting costs a mere $3500 dollars. What, you may ask, is the average salary of a construction worker?

Average Construction Worker Yearly Salary in New York. Construction Workers earn an average yearly salary of $43,311. Salaries typically start from $22,498 and go up to $74,251. (source)

It isn’t clear whether those dollars are before or after taxes. Likely before taxes.

If you split 43K 12 ways, that number comes out to $3609 a month — total pay. That’s an AVERAGE salary, remember. Some will be higher, but some will also be lower.

And her outfit for this SINGLE PHOTO shoot costs basically one month’s total salary.

Isn’t that ‘defender of the little guy’ schtick just a little too ‘rich’? Not so long ago, she was slinging drinks at a bar. Now she’s dressed to the nines.

Tell us more about how your socialism will help the little guy.

Don’t forget to cite that Orwellian line about some people being more equal than others.

Here’s the cost breakdown:

Compare and contrast what you read above to that already-discredited Nikki Haley piece in the NYT.

They led with the following title:
Nikki Haley’s View of New York Is Priceless. Her Curtains? $52,701

Fifty-two large is a lot of cash to blow on curtains, right? Some would call it a reckless use of taxpayer dollars? And that NYT piece paints her as being indulgent and out-of-touch, doesn’t it?

It sure did.

Right up until the moment they were forced to print a retraction.

Here’s the REVISED NYT title, and the editor’s note inserted as the lead paragraph:

State Department Spent $52,701 on Curtains for Residence of U.N. Envoy

Editors’ Note: September 14, 2018

An earlier version of this article and headline created an unfair impression about who was responsible for the purchase in question. While Nikki R. Haley is the current ambassador to the United Nations, the decision on leasing the ambassador’s residence and purchasing the curtains was made during the Obama administration, according to current and former officials. The article should not have focused on Ms. Haley, nor should a picture of her have been used. The article and headline have now been edited to reflect those concerns, and the picture has been removed.

 

WATCH: Sick Clerk Collapses In Store – What These Teens Do Will Make You See RED

H/T Clash Daily.

These feral ghetto apes need to be locked up and the key should be thrown away.

This story will recalibrate your cold-blooded-bastard-o-meter. Because the ‘kids’ in this story take us to new lows.

First, two boys were busted shoplifting by the guy behind the counter. As far as convenience stores go, that’s a tale as old as time.

What happened next ISN’T ‘more of the usual’.

After being spotted grabbing and eating pepperoni sticks without paying, they were approached by the clerk.

However, he collapsed into a display of water bottles.

He never got up. It was a 911 emergency situation where the man’s life was in danger. What would a reasonable person do in that situation? Call for help. What did THESE kids do? Well, not that.

Watch the Q13 news report: