Nolte: Nevada’s Democrat Governor Outlaws Antimalarial Drugs for Coronavirus Sufferers

H/T Breitbart.

Gov. Steve Sisolak(Delusional-NV)needs to know hydroxychloroquine is also used to treat arthritis.

I know I have been taking it four years for rheumatoid arthritis in my hands without this drug my hands would get stiff and not function.

I read somewhere that hydroxychloroquine and Zithromax Z-Pak had helped 350 people with the Coronavirus.  

Nevada’s Democrat Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an order Tuesday outlawing the use of antimalarial drugs for sufferers of the coronavirus.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports the “governor’s order prohibits the prescribing and dispensing chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for a COVID-19 diagnosis[.]”

“At this point in time, there is no known cure for COVID-19 and we must not withhold these drugs from those who need them,” the governor said in his statement. “The best way to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is to stay home for Nevada, not to stockpile these drugs.”

Sisolak said he signed the emergency order after receiving a request from the Pharmacy Board, which claims the effectiveness of these drugs to treat the Chinese virus has “not been established,” and that “an emergency exists due to the hoarding and stockpiling” of these antimalaria drugs: chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine.

This order makes no sense, especially in a world where another Democrat governor, Andrew Cuomo of New York, has ordered trials of the malaria drug. Saying he agrees with the president, Cuomo announced last week: “We’re also implementing the trial drug:”

We have secured 70,000 hydrocloroquin; 10,000 zithromax from the federal government. I want to thank the FDA for moving very expeditiously to get us this supply.

The President ordered the FDA to move and the FDA moved. We’re going to get the supply and the trial will start this Tuesday. The President is optimistic about these drugs and we are all optimistic that it could work.

I’ve spoken with a number of health officials and there is a good basis to believe that they could work. Some health officials point to Africa, which has a very low infection rate and there’s a theory that because they’re taking these anti-malaria drugs in Africa, it may actually be one of the reasons why the infection rate is low in Africa. We don’t know, but let’s find out and let’s find out quickly. And I agree with the President on that and we’re going to start and we’re going to start Tuesday.

While Sisolak is correct that the FDA has not approved the drug for coronavirus sufferers, the FDA has approved the drug for a number of other ailments, which means it is safe for human consumption — as long you consult with your doctor and follow the prescription orders.

In other words, what you don’t want to do is look for something that might have hydroxychloroquine in it and gobble it down, like some poor fool did this week with his fish tank cleaner.

There is plenty of anecdotal evidence to support giving these drugs a try… This includes studies… Again, we’re a long way from FDA approval through clinical trials,  and the Africa correlation Cuomo spoke of might indeed have nothing to do with the malaria drug and have everything to do with Africa’s heat. Scientists believe the Chinese virus doesn’t fare well in warm weather.

Nonetheless, if someone I loved was in throes of the Wuhan virus and I lived in Nevada and was not allowed to try everything reasonable to save this person, I’d be furious. And this malaria drug *is* reasonable. What’s more, how can there be hoarding going on in Nevada when 1) you can only acquire this drug through a prescription, and 2) there are only around 300 coronavirus sufferers throughout the entire state?

As far as I know, the only “hoarding” going on is by those who can write a prescription to themselves, meaning doctors and the like. But the shortage is a worldwide shortage, and for obvious reasons: countries all over the world want  the drug to help their own coronavirus sufferers.

It would make perfect sense for Sisolak to outlaw doctors prescribing these drugs as a preemptive prescription, as a “just in case” prescription. But to deny it to those already suffering with the coronavirus is a gross violation of human rights, and an infringement of the relationship between patient and doctor.

This stinks of partisan politics, of an anti-science governor putting the trolling of Trump over the well-being of his own citizens.

Donald Trump on Reopening Economy ‘I’d Love to Have it Open by Easter’

H/T Breitbart.

I think President Trump is on the right track.

I do not think the small mom and pop businesses will survive a shutdown that goes beyond Easter.

President Donald Trump said during a Fox News town hall on Tuesday that he wanted to get the economy reopened by Easter.

“I’d love to have it open by Easter,” Trump said, setting a date for reopening the country for the first time.

Easter is on April 12.

“I would love to have the country opened up and rearing to go by Easter,” he repeated.

“That would be a great American resurrection,” Fox News moderator Bill Hemer replied

The president has promised to listen to his doctors and advisers on loosening restrictions set by the government to fight the coronavirus pandemic, but has said would ultimately make the final decision.

Trump appeared upbeat during the event, pleased that the stock market rose over 1,600 points on Tuesday.

He said he looked forward to the day that Americans could go to work, noting that a massive economic depression had its own death toll.

“We can socially distance ourselves and go to work, and you’ll have to work a little bit harder,” Trump said. “You can clean your hands five times as more as you used to, you don’t have to shake hands anymore with people.”

Trump said again that he wanted the economy reopened in weeks, not months and suggested that the United States would be ready.

“It’s not built to shut down,” he said. “Our people are full of vim and vigor and energy. They don’t want to be locked in a house or an apartment or some space.”

The president said that putting restrictions on Americans last week was “one of the most difficult decisions that he ever made.”

“You’re basically turning off the country,” he said, adding that, “I wasn’t happy about it, and I also knew I had to do it.”

Trump said that the economic shutdown was “painful” and “destabilizing” but that it would soon be time for Americans to return to their lives.

“We have to go back to work, much sooner than people thought, and people can go back to work and they can also practice good judgment,” he said.

Dr. Deborah Birx said during the town hall that she would continue looking at the data, and urged Americans to continue following the restrictions set by the Centers for Disease Control.

Media Blame Donald Trump for Man’s Death After Ingesting Fish Tank Cleaner

H/T Breitbart.

I do not understand how President Trump is responsible for what this man did.

The media rushed to blame President Donald Trump on Monday for the death of an Arizona man who ingested a form of chloroquine — before it turned out that the man had ingested a fish tank cleaner with a similar chemical.

Reuters reported

An Arizona man has died and his wife is in critical condition after they ingested chloroquine phosphate – an aquarium cleaning product similar to drugs that have been named by President Trump as potential treatments for coronavirus infection.

The couple, in their 60s, experienced immediate distress after swallowing the drug, an additive used at aquariums to clean fish tanks, according to Banner Health Hospital in Phoenix.

Chloroquine phosphate shares the same active ingredient as malaria drugs that President Trump has touted as possibly effective against COVID-19, the potentially life-threatening disease caused by the coronavirus.

Many media outlets, however, reported that the man died after taking “chloroquine.”

Axios, for example, had to delete a tweet and issue a correction after reporting, initially: “Man dies after self-medicating with chloroquine.”

Axios

@axios

We have deleted this tweet and corrected our story because it did not reflect the full nature of the self-medication done with an additive commonly used to clean fish tanks. https://www.axios.com/chloroquine-coronavirus-death-09c91a91-4fe7-472c-9de9-79b890aa8fff.html 

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The website added an “editor’s note” to the story: “Editor’s note: This story has been updated to reflect the fact that the form of chloroquine the couple ingested was used in aquariums — and it was not a medication.”

BuzzFeed reported: “A Man Died After Self-Medicating With A Drug Trump Promoted As A Potential Treatment For The Coronavirus.”

The text described “a drug meant for aquariums” without distinguishing between a product sold for fish tanks and a product for humans prepared by a pharmacist and supplied with a medical prescription.

President Trump has spoken specifically about the medically-supervised use of chloroquine — specifically, a drug called hydroxychloroquine, often used in combination with azithromycin, which has shown anecdotal efficacy in treating coronavirus victims, though it has not yet been proven to do so in clinical trials.

On Monday, he praised New York Governor Andrew Cuomo for launching clinical trials of the experimental medication regimen. Trump spoke specifically about “the hydroxychloroquine and the Z-Pak,” the latter another name for azithromycin.

Last week, NBC News’ Peter Alexander accused Trump of giving Americans “false hope” by touting the potential of the drug. The false claims about Trump encouraging a man to ingest fish tank cleaner are in the same vein.

After Trump supporters noticed the errors in reporting about the man’s death, the phrase “FISH TANK CLEANER” began trending nationwide on Twitter late Monday night.

15 Frequently Asked Questions, About Coronavirus and COVID-19

H/T Mental Floss.

The new coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19, is officially a pandemic. People in every U.S. state and more than 160 countries are infected. And although it’s highly contagious, it’s also possible to recover from its respiratory symptoms—in fact, recovery numbers are steadily increasing around the globe.

As we wait for the new coronavirus to run its course, it’s good to stay informed. This no-nonsense, panic-free FAQ answers some of your most pressing questions.

1. WHAT IS THE NEW CORONAVIRUS?

The new coronavirus is the same type of virus that causes the common cold and flu, as well as more serious illnesses like SARS and MERS, and this new one is extremely serious. It causes a respiratory disease called COVID-19 (which is an abbreviation of Corona Virus Disease 2019). The virus emerged in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. It has since spread throughout the world. People who get the virus can be asymptomatic, feel like they have a cold or flu, or have complications causing pneumonia and possible death. It spreads from person to person through infected droplets when a person coughs, sneezes, or exhales. You can catch it by touching a surface that an infected person touched, or being in the direct path of their droplets.

2. CAN MY PETS BE INFECTED WITH THE NEW CORONAVIRUS, OR CAN I CATCH IT FROM MY PETS?

Although a dog in Hong Kong tested positive for the new coronavirus, the possibility of transmission between pets and their owners is still relatively unknown. Aside from this infected dog—which was never actively sick, even though the dog’s owner was—there have been no other reports and no evidence of transmission from person to pet, or vice versa.

Remember, though, that your pet’s toys or food bowl “could potentially have the virus on it,” Monya De, an internist in Los Angeles, tells Mental Floss. “Can they go lick the neighbor kid, and the neighbor kid has disease, and they then transmit it to you? I’d be more worried about surfaces.”

3. HOW LONG DOES THE NEW CORONAVIRUS STAY ON VARIOUS SURFACES?

We don’t know for sure, but the World Health Organization (WHO) does note that it can stay on certain surfaces for a few hours up to a few days, similar to previous coronaviruses. A recent study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine on March 17, found that the virus is detectable on these materials for these durations:

Aerosols: three hours
Copper: four hours
Cardboard: up to 24 hours
Plastic: two to three days
Stainless steel: two to three days

The CDC recommends cleaning frequently-touched surfaces often—including doorknobs, phones, faucets, and light switches—with a regular household cleaner or wipe. It probably wouldn’t hurt to blast your Amazon deliveries with a disinfectant spray before opening them, too.

4. DOES DRINKING ALCOHOL KILL THE NEW CORONAVIRUS?

No, not even a little. Alcohol may kill the virus on surfaces when it’s in sanitizer, but it won’t work for your own body. “When you consume alcohol, it immediately starts to break down in your GI tract,” De says. “It has much more chance of causing liver damage and damage to your mucous membranes over time. The alcohol is broken down before it has the chance to sterilize your body in any way.”

5. DO I NEED TO WASH ALL MY FOOD?

Probably not, unless you saw someone sneeze on, breathe on, cough on, or manhandle your groceries. Coronaviruses are spread from person to person through infected respiratory droplets. There’s no evidence of the food itself transmitting the disease. But it doesn’t hurt to be sanitary: Wash your hands before handling food, wash your fruits and vegetables as you normally do, and cook everything to the right temperature.

6. HOW IS COVID-19 DIFFERENT FROM THE FLU OR A COLD?

COVID-19 symptoms are frustratingly similar to the common cold and flu. Here’s what symptoms you should expect, depending on what virus you have.

COVID-19: Slowly developing fever, cough, fatigue, shortness of breath
Cold: Sneezing, aches and pains, runny or stuffy nose, sore throat
Flu: Rapid-onset fever, cough, fatigue, aches and pains, headache

7. IF I’M UNLIKELY TO BECOME SERIOUSLY ILL, IS IT OK TO GO OUTSIDE?

Nope. People of any age are able to catch the virus, and you may be asymptomatic and have the disease without knowing it. Staying inside and away from other people is the only way to stop the spread at this point. Even if you don’t think you’ll get sick, someone you come in contact with could, and they could be immunocompromised—meaning it would do far worse harm to them than to you. If you absolutely must go out, keep a distance of about 6 feet between you and anyone else.

8. ARE MOST SERIOUS CASES OF COVID-19 IN THE ELDERLY?

Most serious cases are in people who have compromised immune systems. That means the elderly, plus anyone with an underlying health condition like asthma, diabetes, heart disease, or lung disease—regardless of their age.

9. WHAT ARE THE BEST PROTECTION MEASURES AGAINST THE NEW CORONAVIRUS?

Wash your hands regularly with soap and water. If you can’t do that, use antibacterial hand sanitizer. Keep 6 feet between you and other people. Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. Cover your mouth with a tissue or your elbow when you cough or sneeze. If you feel sick, stay home.

10. CAN I TAKE ANTIBIOTICS OR A VACCINE FOR COVID-19?

There is currently no treatment or vaccine for the virus. Antibiotics won’t work because they treat bacterial infections, not viral infections. Possible treatments and vaccines are in clinical trials, but it will still be a while before they’re available to the general public.

11. SHOULD I WEAR A MASK?

Only if you’re actively sick with COVID-19 symptoms or treating someone who is. Masks are most important for sick people to wear so they lower the chances of spreading the disease by stopping any infected particles from getting into the air. There’s a worldwide shortage of masks right now, and you shouldn’t use one unless you absolutely have to. Plus, most medical masks available to the general public are single-use and don’t effectively stop the virus from spreading.

12. WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I THINK I’M SICK WITH COVID-19 SYMPTOMS?

If you have symptoms or have been in contact with an infected person, call your doctor. They’ll determine if you need to go to the doctor’s office or get tested for the new coronavirus. Plan to isolate yourself until you’re feeling better. Do not go to an emergency room unless you have severe symptoms; you may infect other people there.

13. WHAT’S THE PROPER WAY TO SELF-QUARANTINE OR SELF-ISOLATE?

If you’ve been traveling or have had contact with a potentially infected person, experts recommend quarantining yourself to slow the spread of illness. That means staying home, avoiding visitors, washing your hands frequently, and thoroughly cleaning surfaces during the quarantine period.

If you need to self-isolate because you’ve tested positive or are otherwise sick, you should follow strict guidelines. Stay home, put on a face mask, and limit your contact with other people in your household. Do not go out or get on public transportation. Restrict the amount of time you spend with pets, just in case. Continue to cover your mouth with a tissue or your elbow when you cough or sneeze, and regularly wash your hands. Don’t share household items, and clean common surfaces every day. You’ll want to monitor your symptoms, too. If they change or get worse, be sure to call your doctor.

14. IS CORONAVIRUS SOME SORT OF DEEP-STATE CONSPIRACY?

No.

15. HOW CAN I MAINTAIN A SENSE OF SANITY DURING THIS PANDEMIC?

Overall, De says, the biggest thing right now is to be nice to yourself. There’s a lot of lingering anxiety right now, and it’s only made worse with social distancing measures and the constant flow of news. She suggests adding daily meditation to your routine, and uninstalling news apps, even if just for a day. Read a book instead of watching TV or playing on your phone. Have a virtual dinner party or movie night, or play board game over Skype.

“There are a lot of ways you can relieve stress and still maintain that personal connection without visiting anyone right now,” she says. “This is really a time to treat yourself to a little escapism.”

Trump Says Economic Impact Of Coronavirus Prevention, May Be Worse Than The Disease

H/T Flag And Cross.

I hope President Trump ends this silly mass isolation.

President Trump recently took to Twitter to express that the economic fallout from the preventative measures being used to fight the spread of the coronavirus could be far worse than the actual effects of the disease itself, a sentiment being shared by many folks who have now found themselves forced to stay home instead of work during the periods of lockdown.

LOOK:

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

WE CANNOT LET THE CURE BE WORSE THAN THE PROBLEM ITSELF. AT THE END OF THE 15 DAY PERIOD, WE WILL MAKE A DECISION AS TO WHICH WAY WE WANT TO GO!

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Check out the details from The Washington Examiner:

The White House asked the public last week to self-quarantine in a campaign that advised “15 Days to Slow the Spread” of the novel coronavirus, a highly transmissible disease. The measure would come to an end around March 31.

But the economy is reeling in what the Wall Street Journal editorial board described last week as “a rolling economic calamity” with costs to individuals and businesses growing “by the hour.”

In a televised press conference on Sunday, Trump gave a clue as to his thinking about how the measures would resolve. “We’ll get a pretty good idea what we’re doing” at the end of the 15-day period. “You know there will be a point at which we say: ‘We’re back in business, let’s go.’”

Three days after announcing the 15-day plan on March 16, President Trump was discussing the possibilities of getting folks back to work, according to reports from Bloomberg News.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, making an appearance on Fox News, said that the virus had shut down nearly three-quarters of the economy.

Sen. Rick Scott called for a 30-day coronavirus recovery plan “to get America back to normal” in the wake of the pandemic. “Americans are scared because of the uncertainty the Coronavirus has brought,” Scott wrote. “Small businesses are closing, people feel isolated and there’s no end in sight,” he added. He called for same-day testing, all domestic and international air travel to be shut down, and a moratorium on all financial obligations — including rent, credit card payments, mortgages, and utilities.

Health authorities have advocated for a prolonged period of isolation, and as of now, it’s up in the air whether or not those measures can be relaxed by April 1.

There are, right now, more than 35,200 confirmed coronavirus cases and 473 deaths, according to reports from Johns Hopkins University.