Poll: Majority of Americans Want First Amendment Rewritten

H/T The Washington Free Beacon.

Why did this poll only include Millennials?

Nobody I know wants to rewrite the First Amendment.

51 percent of Millennials want fines or jail time for ‘hate speech’

A majority of Americans believe the First Amendment should be rewritten and are willing to crack down on free speech, as well as the press, according to a new poll.

More than 60 percent of Americans agree on restricting speech in some way, while a slim majority, 51 percent, want to see the First Amendment rewritten to “reflect the cultural norms of today.” The Campaign for Free Speech, which conducted the survey, said the results “indicate free speech is under more threat than previously believed.”

“The findings are frankly extraordinary,” executive director Bob Lystad told the Washington Free Beacon. “Our free speech rights and our free press rights have evolved well over 200 years, and people now seem to be rethinking them.”

Of the 1,004 respondents, young people were the most likely to support curbing free expression and punishing those who engage in “hate speech.” Nearly 60 percent of Millennials—respondents between the ages of 21 and 38—agreed that the Constitution “goes too far in allowing hate speech in modern America” and should be rewritten, compared to 48 percent of Gen Xers and 47 percent of Baby Boomers. A majority of Millennials also supported laws that would make “hate speech” a crime—of those supporters, 54 percent said violators should face jail time.

American hostility to the First Amendment did not stop at speech. Many would also like to see a crackdown on the free press. Nearly 60 percent of respondents agreed that the “government should be able to take action against newspapers and TV stations that publish content that is biased, inflammatory, or false.” Of those respondents, 46 percent supported possible jail time.

The poll was released just two days after two University of Connecticut students were arrested for allegedly saying racial slurs in a viral video. The 21-year-old suspects were allegedly playing “a game in which they yelled vulgar words,” according to the police report. Lystad said such incidents and the rise of social media may be behind the increased willingness of Americans to curb speech rights.

“I think [our findings] are fueled in large part because of a rise of hate speech, but traditionally, hate speech is protected in the First Amendment,” Lystad said. “The Supreme Court has upheld that principle time and time again.”

Lystad launched the Campaign for Free Speech to advocate for preserving free and open dialogue in America. The group emphasizes that hate speech should be denounced, but does not think censorship is the answer. The group plans to push back against efforts to restrict speech at the local, state, and federal levels.

“Hate speech should be condemned, but legally, the answer to speech we don’t like is more speech, not censorship,” he said. “Our primary focus is education, and to help people better understand the First Amendment, free speech, free press, and why it’s so vital to our democracy.”

 

Majority of Americans WANT the ‘Citizenship Question’ On the U.S. Census

H/T Godfather Politics.

The citizenship question was on the census form until Bathhouse Barry Obama removed it.

With yet another liberal court intervening to try and stop the Trump administration from doing its job, a new poll finds that a majority of people WANT the “citizenship question” to be placed on the upcoming 2020 U.S. Census.

The administration had proposed adding a question to ascertain if those replying to the census were official U.S. citizens. But the courts struck down the proposal.

The U.S. Supreme Court rejected the citizenship question that the Trump administration proposed, but the court did not say that no citizenship question is permissible. Now the administration is considering altering the question for inclusion on the 2020 Census.

But, according to a new Economist/YouGov poll, most Americans want such a question on the Census. The poll found that 53 percent want the question whereas only 32 percent do not, the Washington Examiner reported.

The survey asked: “Do you think the federal government should or should not ask people whether they are American citizens as part of the 2020 census?”

The results:
-Should ask 53%
-Should not ask 32%
-Not sure 14%

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

The News Reports about the Department of Commerce dropping its quest to put the Citizenship Question on the Census is incorrect or, to state it differently, FAKE! We are absolutely moving forward, as we must, because of the importance of the answer to this question.

48K people are talking about this

According to George Washington University Law professor John Banzhaf, the citizenship question should be able to pass Constitutional muster.

“There are several rationales — including one based upon the Constitution itself — which could well still persuade the courts to permit a citizenship question on the census, especially if the explanation were included in the executive order now being considered, rather than in some new declaration by the Secretary of Commerce,” Banzhaf said.

Indeed, such a question was on the U.S. Census from 1850 until Eisenhower eliminated it for the 1950 Census.

The media did not really report that the question had been removed by the Eisenhower administration. Worse, current reporting of Trump’s decision to put it back is often presented without telling the public that the question has only been missing from only seven Census forms in the last 170 years.