George Washington’s 1789 Thanksgiving Proclamation

The story below is by  Rush Limbaugh.

It is a very good history lesson.
The George Washington 1789 Thanksgiving proclamation.
Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor — and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me “to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.
“Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be — That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks — for his kind care and protection of thePeople of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation — for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Providence which we experienced in the tranquility [sic], union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed — for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted — for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us.
And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions — to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually — to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a
Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed — to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shewn [sic] kindness onto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord — To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the encrease [sic] of science among them and us — and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best.
Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789.
George Washington You want me to count the number of references to God?
How about just the first line? “Whereas, it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and to humbly implore His protection and favor.
“Let’s see. One, two, three, four references in just that first clause.
What a fanatic, George Washington!Just wanted you to hear that.
That’s the first Thanksgiving proclamation in 1789.
The real story of Thanksgiving — and by the way, the real story is continuing, what I just read to you.
The thanks was given to God, not the Indians.

The Real Story Of Thanksgiving

H/T Rush Limbaugh.

rushthanksgiving2011

Here at EIB we are wishing you and your family a Happy Thanksgiving.
No matter what you think of Rush Limbaugh, This is good.

RUSH: Time now, ladies and gentlemen, for The Real Story of Thanksgiving, as written by I — by me — in my second book, See, I Told You So.
It’s page 70 in the hardcover version. “On August 1, 1620, the Mayflower set sail. It carried a total of 102 passengers, including forty Pilgrims led by William Bradford.

On the journey, Bradford set up an agreement, a contract, that established just and equal laws for all members of the new community, irrespective of their religious beliefs.
Where did the revolutionary ideas expressed in the Mayflower Compact come from? From the Bible.

The Pilgrims were a people completely steeped in the lessons of the Old and New Testaments.
They looked to the ancient Israelites for their example. And, because of the biblical precedents set forth in Scripture, they never doubted that their experiment would work.”
Now, you know the usual story of Thanksgiving: They landed. They had no clue where they were, no idea how to feed themselves.

The Indians came out, showed ‘em how to pop popcorn, fed ‘em turkey, saved ‘em basically — and then white European settlers after that basically wiped out the Indian population.
It’s a horrible example. Not only is that not true, here is the part that’s been omitted from what is still today taught as the traditional Thanksgiving story in many schools.

“The original contract the Pilgrims had entered into with their merchant-sponsors in London called for everything they produced to go into a common store,’ when they got here, ‘and each member of the community was entitled to one common share.

All of the land they cleared and the houses they built belong to the community as well. “They were going to distribute it equally. All of the land they cleared and the houses they built belonged to the community as well. … [William] Bradford, who had become the new governor of the colony, recognized that this form of collectivism was as costly and destructive to the Pilgrims as that first harsh winter, which had taken so many lives.

He decided to take bold action. Bradford assigned a plot of land to each family to work and manage, thus turning loose the power of the marketplace. … Long before Karl Marx was even born, the Pilgrims had discovered and experimented with what could only be described as socialism,’ and it had failed” miserably because when every put things in the common store, some people didn’t have to put things in for there to be, people who didn’t produce anything were taking things out, and it caused resentment just as it does today.

So Bradford had to change it. “What Bradford and his community found was that the most creative and industrious people had no incentive to work any harder than anyone else, unless they could utilize the power of personal motivation! But while most of the rest of the world has been experimenting with socialism for well over a hundred years – trying to refine it, perfect it, and re-invent it – the Pilgrims decided early on to scrap it permanently.
What Bradford wrote about this social experiment should be in every schoolchild’s history lesson.

If it were, we might prevent much needless suffering,” that happens today and will happen “in the future. ‘The experience that we had in this common course and condition, tried sundry years…that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing – as if they were wiser than God,’ Bradford wrote.

“‘For this community (so far as it was) was found to breed much confusion and discontent, and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort.
For young men that were most able and fit for labor and service did repine that they should spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children without [being paid] that was thought injustice.’ … The Pilgrims found that people could not be expected to do their best work without incentive. So what did Bradford’s community try next?

They unharnessed the power of good old free enterprise by invoking the undergirding capitalistic principle of private property. Every family was assigned its own plot of land to work and permitted to market its own crops and products.

And what was the result?” Here’s what Bradford wrote, the governor of the Massachusetts colony. “‘This had very good success,’ wrote Bradford, ‘for it made all hands industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been.’

Bradford doesn’t sound like much of a Clintonite, does he?” or an Obamaite, if I can update it. “Is it possible that supply-side economics could have existed before the 1980s? … Anyway, the pilgrims found “In no time, the Pilgrims found they had more food than they could eat themselves. … So they set up trading posts and exchanged goods with the Indians.

The profits allowed them to pay off their debts to the merchants in London. And the success and prosperity of the Plymouth settlement attracted more Europeans and began what came to be known as the ‘Great Puritan Migration.” Very few people have heard this story or have had it taught to them — and the “thanks” was to God for showing them the way.

In later parts of the chapter, I quote John Adams and George Washington on their reminisces and their thoughts on the first Thanksgiving and the notion it was thanks to God.

It was an entirely different story than is being taught in the schools. It’s been muddied down, watered down all these years — and now it’s been hijacked by the multicultural community — to the point that the story of Thanksgiving is the Pilgrims were a bunch of incompetents and were saved only by the goodness of the Indians, who then were wiped out.

And that’s what kids are being taught today — ’cause, of course, you can’t mention the Bible in school, and that’s fundamental to the real story of Thanksgiving.

May God Bless and keep you safe.

Rush Limbaugh: Simply the Best

H/T Town  Hall.

Rush Limbaugh helped make Conservative talk radio what it is today.

His death left a giant hole in Conservative talk radio.

Rush Limbaugh has died. And it hurts. Significantly.

 

And that’s kind of weird, isn’t it? I mean, considering we’ve known this day was coming for over a year since his gut-wrenching announcement of stage 4, terminal cancer. Yet, despite knowing this day was coming, so many of us are left devastated and speechless.

Why?  

It’s easy. Rush Limbaugh was the very best. And we have all been lucky enough to witness this greatness in our lives in a very intimate way, every day for more than three decades.

It’s impossible to not feel tremendous loss when that kind of brilliance is ripped away from our daily routine. 

As a radio broadcaster with the unique opportunity to follow Rush on his DC affiliate, WMAL, I can tell you that what Rush was able to do, consistently, at the very highest level of a medium he helped create, was other-worldly.

Rush was to talk radio what The Beatles were to rock and roll. He was to talk radio what Tom Brady was to professional football. He was to talk radio what Michael Jordan was to basketball.

The Beatles, Brady, and Jordan were all truly gifted, that’s obvious. But they also worked their butts off. They were obsessed with doing what they loved to do with passion and a level of perfectionism that their peers would only marvel at.

But what makes Rush’s contribution to our culture even more significant is the sheer volume of his output. Three hours per day. Five days per week. Live. No edits, no do-overs, no second takes. For thirty years.

Now recognize that all of those hundreds of thousands of hours were delivered to millions of listeners for over three decades. He was number one when he hit the national scene in the early 1990s, and he remained at the top of his game right up to the end. That level of performance is un-equaled.

He was, without any quarrel, the best at what he did. He will never be equaled.

But the emotional impact of his passing goes well beyond the excellence of his daily creative output. It was the intimacy of the medium in which he dwelled.

No other mass communication medium is as intimate and personal as talk radio. Rush was literally a part of our lives every single day. He talked to us, and he made it seem very personal. He was talking to you. We felt like we knew him. And we were damn sure he knew us.

Even more important, our daily conversation would often take place in a very solitary and personal setting. He was the person in the car with us as we were driving our mundane commute. Or he was the person in our empty home filling the silence before the kids came home from school. Or he was the person talking to us in our earphones at work because the liberal in the cubicle next to us would go nuts if we put Rush on speaker.

That kind of intimacy creates a real relationship. And he was always saying the thing that was on our minds. 

This is a very important point… because Rush’s critics always… always misunderstood him. Maybe it was purposeful. Rush’s critics always depicted him as an angry flame-thrower ranting into his microphone and giving marching orders to his army of ignorant, brainwashed minions.

They couldn’t be more wrong about all of that.

Rush was always smiling… and he was always funny. And he wasn’t giving us marching orders by telling us what to think. It was, in fact, the very opposite.

Rush wasn’t telling us what to think; he was articulating what we already believed. He was just the first to come along and respect us for our views, told us he shared them, and then he used his talents (on loan from God) to crystalize those ideas and articulate them in a clever, succinct, and entertaining way. And… never forget this… he was communicating those ideas on our behalf.

He was there for us. Not to tell us what to think but to help us articulate what we believed and remind us that we are not alone. And he did that in a very personal way.

That kind of emotional connection through conversation is not easily ripped away from us without it leaving a mark… a hole. And, make no mistake, it is a hole that will not be replaced. Never.

There was only one Rush. And he was the very best at what he did. And he did it at the top of his industry for more than three decades.

And now, he’s gone. And we are hurting. And that space he filled so well is empty and will never be filled.

We are left with one common realization: We were so lucky to have him while we did.

And now, it’s up to all of us to carry on and see his vision through. We are not alone. We never were. And we must keep his conversation going. Somehow.

Thank you, Rush. Time to give that talent back to God he so generously lent you. Thank him for us. 

Rest in peace.

The Real Story Of Thanksgiving

H/T Rush Limbaugh.

 

rushthanksgiving2011

Here at EIB we are wishing you and your family a Happy Thanksgiving.
No matter what you think of Rush Limbaugh, This is good.

RUSH: Time now, ladies and gentlemen, for The Real Story of Thanksgiving, as written by I — by me — in my second book, See, I Told You So.
It’s page 70 in the hardcover version. “On August 1, 1620, the Mayflower set sail. It carried a total of 102 passengers, including forty Pilgrims led by William Bradford.

On the journey, Bradford set up an agreement, a contract, that established just and equal laws for all members of the new community, irrespective of their religious beliefs.
Where did the revolutionary ideas expressed in the Mayflower Compact come from? From the Bible.

The Pilgrims were a people completely steeped in the lessons of the Old and New Testaments.
They looked to the ancient Israelites for their example. And, because of the biblical precedents set forth in Scripture, they never doubted that their experiment would work.”
Now, you know the usual story of Thanksgiving: They landed. They had no clue where they were, no idea how to feed themselves.

The Indians came out, showed ‘em how to pop popcorn, fed ‘em turkey, saved ‘em basically — and then white European settlers after that basically wiped out the Indian population.
It’s a horrible example. Not only is that not true, here is the part that’s been omitted from what is still today taught as the traditional Thanksgiving story in many schools.

“The original contract the Pilgrims had entered into with their merchant-sponsors in London called for everything they produced to go into a common store,’ when they got here, ‘and each member of the community was entitled to one common share.

All of the land they cleared and the houses they built belong to the community as well. “They were going to distribute it equally. All of the land they cleared and the houses they built belonged to the community as well. … [William] Bradford, who had become the new governor of the colony, recognized that this form of collectivism was as costly and destructive to the Pilgrims as that first harsh winter, which had taken so many lives.

He decided to take bold action. Bradford assigned a plot of land to each family to work and manage, thus turning loose the power of the marketplace. … Long before Karl Marx was even born, the Pilgrims had discovered and experimented with what could only be described as socialism,’ and it had failed” miserably because when every put things in the common store, some people didn’t have to put things in for there to be, people who didn’t produce anything were taking things out, and it caused resentment just as it does today.

So Bradford had to change it. “What Bradford and his community found was that the most creative and industrious people had no incentive to work any harder than anyone else, unless they could utilize the power of personal motivation! But while most of the rest of the world has been experimenting with socialism for well over a hundred years – trying to refine it, perfect it, and re-invent it – the Pilgrims decided early on to scrap it permanently.
What Bradford wrote about this social experiment should be in every schoolchild’s history lesson.

If it were, we might prevent much needless suffering,” that happens today and will happen “in the future. ‘The experience that we had in this common course and condition, tried sundry years…that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing – as if they were wiser than God,’ Bradford wrote.

“‘For this community (so far as it was) was found to breed much confusion and discontent, and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort.
For young men that were most able and fit for labor and service did repine that they should spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children without [being paid] that was thought injustice.’ … The Pilgrims found that people could not be expected to do their best work without incentive. So what did Bradford’s community try next?

They unharnessed the power of good old free enterprise by invoking the undergirding capitalistic principle of private property. Every family was assigned its own plot of land to work and permitted to market its own crops and products.

And what was the result?” Here’s what Bradford wrote, the governor of the Massachusetts colony. “‘This had very good success,’ wrote Bradford, ‘for it made all hands industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been.’

Bradford doesn’t sound like much of a Clintonite, does he?” or an Obamaite, if I can update it. “Is it possible that supply-side economics could have existed before the 1980s? … Anyway, the pilgrims found “In no time, the Pilgrims found they had more food than they could eat themselves. … So they set up trading posts and exchanged goods with the Indians.

The profits allowed them to pay off their debts to the merchants in London. And the success and prosperity of the Plymouth settlement attracted more Europeans and began what came to be known as the ‘Great Puritan Migration.” Very few people have heard this story or have had it taught to them — and the “thanks” was to God for showing them the way.

In later parts of the chapter, I quote John Adams and George Washington on their reminisces and their thoughts on the first Thanksgiving and the notion it was thanks to God.

It was an entirely different story than is being taught in the schools. It’s been muddied down, watered down all these years — and now it’s been hijacked by the multicultural community — to the point that the story of Thanksgiving is the Pilgrims were a bunch of incompetents and were saved only by the goodness of the Indians, who then were wiped out.

And that’s what kids are being taught today — ’cause, of course, you can’t mention the Bible in school, and that’s fundamental to the real story of Thanksgiving.

May God Bless and keep you safe.

George Washington’s 1789 Thanksgiving Proclamation

th-1

The story below is by Rush Limbaugh.

It is a very good history lesson.
 
The George Washington 1789 Thanksgiving proclamation.
 
Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor — and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me “to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.
 
 “Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be — That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks — for his kind care and protection of the People of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation — for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Providence which we experienced in the tranquility [sic], union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed — for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted — for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us.
 
And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions — to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually — to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed — to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shewn [sic] kindness onto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord — To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the encrease [sic] of science among them and us — and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best.
 
Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789.
 
George Washington You want me to count the number of references to God?
 
 
How about just the first line? “Whereas, it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and to humbly implore His protection and favor.
 
 
“Let’s see. One, two, three, four references in just that first clause.
 
What a fanatic, George Washington!.Just wanted you to hear that.
 
That’s the first Thanksgiving proclamation in 1789.
 
The real story of Thanksgiving — and by the way, the real story is continuing, what I just read to you.
 
The thanks was given to God, not the Indians.

Rush Limbaugh: A Loving Brother and ‘a Friend to Countless Americans’

H/T Town Hall.

I am proud to say I have been a Ditto Head since 1988.

I am uniquely blessed to be Rush Limbaugh’s brother in ways too numerous to count, and I am blessed to be in the special position of witnessing firsthand the outpouring of love and prayers from his, family, friends and fans. His wife, Kathryn, has been amazing and a rock throughout.

I could fill a book with the well-wishes I’ve received. I sent Rush a link to my “mentions” column on Twitter so he could scroll through it and see for himself what he means to so many people.

These tender expressions of goodwill are uplifting and spiritually affirming. God is at work, and however this plays out, God is good, something Rush has been saying repeatedly in the last few weeks, despite his difficult circumstances.

Many of the messages he has received have brought him to tears, which is not typical for him. These are sobering times.

When Rush began his nationally syndicated radio show, the liberal media monopolized television news, and his show became an oasis and a lifeline for millions who felt their voices had been ignored. He gave them a sense of community, as they came to realize that the principles they believed in, their love for America and its founding ideas, were still commonly held.

He has been depicted as a bombastic shock jock who barely believes his own words and simply exploits his talents to enrich himself. In fact, he has been a calming voice of good cheer, humor and optimism — a respite from the message of negativity and moral chaos emanating from liberal America every day.

Many have praised Rush for saving AM talk radio and creating a professional genre in which he would have no peers — and that’s true. But what moves me more, as his brother, is something I fear people don’t sufficiently appreciate.

He has been the tip of the spear for political conservatism. No one has done more to bring conservatism into the mainstream of American life, and he’s paid a heavy price for it — but he never complains. He has been the left’s favorite target for hate and abuse for decades, opening myriad pathways for thousands of other conservatives to bring their talents and share their message with like-minded Americans. Had Rush not absorbed that mistreatment and kept charging forward with contagious optimism, there is no telling where we would be right now. No matter how fiercely the haters try, they can’t bring him down — they can’t even slow his charge — and more importantly, they cannot wipe the cheer from his face.

They have particularly seized on President Donald Trump’s awarding of the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Rush. Yes, Rush has been a stalwart Trump supporter, but this is not just political. I have given this a lot of thought, and as preposterous as this sounds to his detractors, Rush richly deserves this award — if it is truly intended to honor those who have served the cause of American freedom. For the cause of American freedom, after all, is what Rush is about. It is the essence of what he articulates and promotes. People, especially our soldiers, serve the cause in various ways. But Rush advances it in a different way, and one that should not be undervalued. He helps keep the spirit of liberty alive. He helps sustain the ideas that have made America the freest, strongest and most prosperous nation in history, and a glorious blessing to the world. And sustaining these ideas is indispensable to sustaining our liberties.

Rush’s detractors don’t hate Rush because of the type of person he is. They have no idea. They hate him for what he stands for, and because he has been so effective at promoting ideas they find repugnant. I see it every day. Their hatred is actually transferred hostility for all those who reject their rejection of the American dream. They would not comprehend the showering of love that I’ve personally witnessed since Rush announced his diagnosis. Here’s a heartwarming sampling.

A text from a Democratic friend: “So my buddy called me. He and 50 others are going on a fast to pray for your brother and another person in their group. They did it before for a person in their group and he is cancer free. You guys sure have a lot of people that love you and your family. Awesome.”

Someone tweeted me: “Prayers for you and your family. We are surrounding Rush with prayers of healing and comfort. Everyone was crying when he received his medal. He has done so much to open Americans’ eyes to the truth. God bless.”

Another tweet: “First time I heard Rush in the ’80s I thought: I am not alone in my thinking.”

Another: “I was so thrilled to see him receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He has worked so hard to educate millions of us that it was well earned. Rush is so important to me. I was crushed to hear the news. I love him very much, as do so many.”

Radio host Chris Stigall wrote: “The thing he does better than any other broadcaster I know is connect. That has always been the thing his haters understood, even if they couldn’t articulate it. He formed a bond and a trust that cannot be broken. …Rush Limbaugh connects with good cheer, warmth, sincerity, a sense of humor and a sense of the everyman no one else fully possesses or can stylistically equal. Despite his fame and wealth over a thirty-plus year career, Rush Limbaugh never became cynical, or hateful, or condescending, or mean-spirited. He loves his country and the people who make it work so very much. It leaps from the speakers every day.”

Bob Lonsberry, another radio broadcaster, wrote: “I love Rush Limbaugh. That’s what I realized yesterday when I heard. … In that moment I was sickened and saddened and blindsided. It wasn’t news, it was personal, and it wasn’t about the legend who created and sustains the industry in which I work, it was about the joyous voice that’s been part of my life for more than 30 years. … It is impossible to calculate the good he has done for America as the leading voice in defense of our nation’s principles of liberty and in opposition to the doctrines of chaos and oppression. … And he is always optimistic. … With Rush, there is always a path forward, and a sense that it’s going to work out. … no matter how the media characterizes him, he is a happy man. He doesn’t bring people down, he lifts them up. … But is he first and foremost a friend to countless Americans? That’s how it looks to me. And that’s how it feels to me. The news yesterday wasn’t about a prominent person, it was about a personal friend. And I’m not the only one. There are tens of millions just like me. Who have found comfort, friendship and validation in a man on the radio. And yesterday hit us hard.”

Exactly. When I read or hear the haters talking about Rush, his show, his message, his soul, I realize I inhabit a different universe than them. They distort who he is, what he says, what he stands for, the kind of person he is. Their antipathy is disturbing. They actually wish him physical, emotional and spiritual harm. “I’m rooting for the cancer.” “I wont be happy until he’s until he’s screaming in agony 24/7.” Lovely. As passionate as I am about my own political beliefs, I never wish harm on those who disagree. If anyone needs prayers, it is them — and I mean that sincerely.

Rush has inspired so many people like this one: “But the main thing I wanted to tell you is that you really did make me who I am now. … You MADE me. Because of you, I was able to completely change careers. … I love what I’m doing now — and, I hope I’m making a difference. I owe all of this — every bit of it — to you. So thank you — for that, and for all you taught me over 36 years and counting.”

I have to say that while I’ve always known Rush is strong, I’ve never seen anything like how he has handled his diagnosis. He has honestly shown no concern for himself. His overriding concern is for his audience, his family and his friends. He is determined not to let any of us down. He seems more concerned about how this news will impact me than how it is affecting him. I am not exaggerating. He has shown more grace and class in this time than I would have thought possible. I couldn’t be prouder of him — and I’m even prouder that he is my brother.

No one knows what the outcome of this will be, but through it all, we must remain positive and optimistic. That matters. And we must draw closer to God.

You Rush fans and well-wishers can’t begin to understand how much you mean to Rush and to us. Your prayers are more comforting and more important than we can describe. God bless Rush, and God bless every one of you.

The Real Story Of Thanksgiving

rushthanksgiving2011

H/T Rush Limbaugh.

Here at EIB we are wishing you and your family a Happy Thanksgiving.
No matter what you think of Rush Limbaugh, This is good.

RUSH: Time now, ladies and gentlemen, for The Real Story of Thanksgiving, as written by I — by me — in my second book, See, I Told You So.
It’s page 70 in the hardcover version. “On August 1, 1620, the Mayflower set sail. It carried a total of 102 passengers, including forty Pilgrims led by William Bradford.

On the journey, Bradford set up an agreement, a contract, that established just and equal laws for all members of the new community, irrespective of their religious beliefs.
Where did the revolutionary ideas expressed in the Mayflower Compact come from? From the Bible.

The Pilgrims were a people completely steeped in the lessons of the Old and New Testaments.
They looked to the ancient Israelites for their example. And, because of the biblical precedents set forth in Scripture, they never doubted that their experiment would work.”
Now, you know the usual story of Thanksgiving: They landed. They had no clue where they were, no idea how to feed themselves.

The Indians came out, showed ‘em how to pop popcorn, fed ‘em turkey, saved ‘em basically — and then white European settlers after that basically wiped out the Indian population.
It’s a horrible example. Not only is that not true, here is the part that’s been omitted from what is still today taught as the traditional Thanksgiving story in many schools.

“The original contract the Pilgrims had entered into with their merchant-sponsors in London called for everything they produced to go into a common store,’ when they got here, ‘and each member of the community was entitled to one common share.

All of the land they cleared and the houses they built belong to the community as well. “They were going to distribute it equally. All of the land they cleared and the houses they built belonged to the community as well. … [William] Bradford, who had become the new governor of the colony, recognized that this form of collectivism was as costly and destructive to the Pilgrims as that first harsh winter, which had taken so many lives.

He decided to take bold action. Bradford assigned a plot of land to each family to work and manage, thus turning loose the power of the marketplace. … Long before Karl Marx was even born, the Pilgrims had discovered and experimented with what could only be described as socialism,’ and it had failed” miserably because when every put things in the common store, some people didn’t have to put things in for there to be, people who didn’t produce anything were taking things out, and it caused resentment just as it does today.

So Bradford had to change it. “What Bradford and his community found was that the most creative and industrious people had no incentive to work any harder than anyone else, unless they could utilize the power of personal motivation! But while most of the rest of the world has been experimenting with socialism for well over a hundred years – trying to refine it, perfect it, and re-invent it – the Pilgrims decided early on to scrap it permanently.
What Bradford wrote about this social experiment should be in every schoolchild’s history lesson.

If it were, we might prevent much needless suffering,” that happens today and will happen “in the future. ‘The experience that we had in this common course and condition, tried sundry years…that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing – as if they were wiser than God,’ Bradford wrote.

“‘For this community (so far as it was) was found to breed much confusion and discontent, and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort.
For young men that were most able and fit for labor and service did repine that they should spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children without [being paid] that was thought injustice.’ … The Pilgrims found that people could not be expected to do their best work without incentive. So what did Bradford’s community try next?

They unharnessed the power of good old free enterprise by invoking the undergirding capitalistic principle of private property. Every family was assigned its own plot of land to work and permitted to market its own crops and products.

And what was the result?” Here’s what Bradford wrote, the governor of the Massachusetts colony. “‘This had very good success,’ wrote Bradford, ‘for it made all hands industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been.’

Bradford doesn’t sound like much of a Clintonite, does he?” or an Obamaite, if I can update it. “Is it possible that supply-side economics could have existed before the 1980s? … Anyway, the pilgrims found “In no time, the Pilgrims found they had more food than they could eat themselves. … So they set up trading posts and exchanged goods with the Indians.

The profits allowed them to pay off their debts to the merchants in London. And the success and prosperity of the Plymouth settlement attracted more Europeans and began what came to be known as the ‘Great Puritan Migration.” Very few people have heard this story or have had it taught to them — and the “thanks” was to God for showing them the way.

In later parts of the chapter, I quote John Adams and George Washington on their reminisces and their thoughts on the first Thanksgiving and the notion it was thanks to God.

It was an entirely different story than is being taught in the schools. It’s been muddied down, watered down all these years — and now it’s been hijacked by the multicultural community — to the point that the story of Thanksgiving is the Pilgrims were a bunch of incompetents and were saved only by the goodness of the Indians, who then were wiped out.

And that’s what kids are being taught today — ’cause, of course, you can’t mention the Bible in school, and that’s fundamental to the real story of Thanksgiving.

May God Bless and keep you safe.

 

George Washington’s 1789 Thanksgiving Proclamation

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The story below is by Rush Limbaugh.

It is a very good history lesson.
The George Washington 1789 Thanksgiving proclamation.
Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor — and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me “to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.
 “Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be — That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks — for his kind care and protection of thePeople of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation — for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Providence which we experienced in the tranquility [sic], union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed — for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted — for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us.
And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions — to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually — to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed — to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shewn [sic] kindness onto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord — To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the encrease [sic] of science among them and us — and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best.
Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789.
George Washington You want me to count the number of references to God?
How about just the first line? “Whereas, it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and to humbly implore His protection and favor.
“Let’s see. One, two, three, four references in just that first clause.
What a fanatic, George Washington!.Just wanted you to hear that.
That’s the first Thanksgiving proclamation in 1789.
The real story of Thanksgiving — and by the way, the real story is continuing, what I just read to you.
The thanks was given to God, not the Indians.