The Washington Post’s Anti-Thanksgiving Screed

This is from The Truth Revolt.

A mental midget from the left sounding off.

The Washington Post on its best day is a bird cage liner.

It should come as no surprise that the left is inherently anti-gratitude. As an anti-human, redistributionist world-view, it derives its power by instilling in people gratitude’s antithesis: Entitlement.

The Washington Post’s Monday column by Brian Palmer, “The Environmental Costs of a Thanksgiving Meal,” is a case study, attacking the traditions enjoyed by Americans for centuries as a reminder that what we receive at the hands of our Creator is often more than we deserve.

Of course, that was before climate change.

Or, to quote Palmer:

Fossil fuels changed that equation.

What follows is a loosely annotated analysis of the supposed greenhouse gas emissions required to bring you your Thanksgiving dinner.

In total, a 3 1/2-ounce serving of turkey is responsible for approximately 2.4 pounds of carbon dioxide equivalents, which is about the same as you produce by driving a car three miles. Of course, you’re not really going to limit yourself to one serving of turkey, so the actual footprint is likely to be larger. I’ll put you down for two servings, or the equivalent of six miles of driving.

Or:

One cup of mashed potatoes will release approximately 1.5 pounds of carbon dioxide equivalents. … Again assuming that you go for seconds, that means the equivalent of driving 3.7 miles.

Dish after dish, the article proceeds to instill doubt and guilt where previously were found only gratitude and humility.

When you add up the turkey, potatoes, vegetables and wine, your Thanksgiving meal might be responsible for emitting more than 10 pounds of greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. If you’re traveling fewer than 10 miles, there’s a good chance you’ll emit more carbon dioxide eating than driving to and from your meal.

When Dan Savage declares “there’s too many goddamn people on the planet” and that abortion should be mandatory for population control, it is a peak behind the curtain, where leftism masquerades as compassionate, tolerant, and equitable, to the true motives that underlie its foundation – the desire of power, control, and destruction.

What Palmer does here, while less obvious, is really more of the same for the anti-human ideology.

H/t: John Nolte

George Washington’s 1789 Thanksgiving Proclamation

The story below is by  Rush Limbaugh.

It is a very good history lesson.
The George Washington 1789 Thanksgiving proclamation.
Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor — and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me “to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.
“Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be — That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks — for his kind care and protection of thePeople of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation — for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Providence which we experienced in the tranquility [sic], union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed — for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted — for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us.
And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions — to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually — to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a
Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed — to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shewn [sic] kindness onto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord — To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the encrease [sic] of science among them and us — and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best.
Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789.
George Washington You want me to count the number of references to God?
How about just the first line? “Whereas, it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and to humbly implore His protection and favor.
“Let’s see. One, two, three, four references in just that first clause.
What a fanatic, George Washington!Just wanted you to hear that.
That’s the first Thanksgiving proclamation in 1789.
The real story of Thanksgiving — and by the way, the real story is continuing, what I just read to you.
The thanks was given to God, not the Indians.

Remembering Pearl Harbor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 79th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

How Americans fought to restore Veterans Day to November

H/T  Yahoo News.

The American people come together to stop the lunacy of Congress and restored Veterans Day.

This Monday, millions of Americans will take time out to honor our military on the traditional time of 11:11 a.m. on November 11. But there was a time when Congress tried to move the holiday, only to face several years of strong public resistance.

U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kleynia R. McKnight via Wikimedia Commons

U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kleynia R. McKnight via Wikimedia Commons

You may recall from history or civics class that the holiday was first called Armistice Day. It was established after World War I to remember the “war to end all wars,” and it was pegged to the time that a cease-fire, or armistice, that occurred in Europe on November 11, 1918. (World War I officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919 in France.)

A year later, President Woodrow Wilson said the armistice anniversary deserved recognition.

“To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations,” he said.

Armistice Day officially received its name through a congressional resolution that was passed on June 4, 1926. By that time, 27 states had made Armistice Day a legal holiday.

Then, in 1938, Armistice Day officially became a national holiday by law, when an act was passed on May 13, 1938, that made November 11 in each year a legal holiday: “a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as “Armistice Day.”

After World War II, the act was amended to honor veterans of World War II and Korea, and the name of the holiday was changed to Veterans Day in 1954. President Dwight D. Eisenhower marked the occasion with a special proclamation.

However, controversy came to the universally recognized holiday in 1968, when Congress tried to change when Veterans Day was celebrated as a national holiday, by moving the holiday to a Monday at the end of October.

The Uniform Monday Holiday Act was signed on June 28, 1968, and it changed the traditional days for Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day, to ensure that the holidays fell on a Monday, giving federal employees a three-day weekend.

The bill moved Veterans Day, at least on a federal level, to the last Monday in October, with the first observance of the new date in 1971.

Veterans groups moved quickly to oppose the date switch, and two states refused to switch their dates in 1971. By 1974, there was confusion over the two dates and most states took a pass on commemorating the holiday in October.

In a typical editorial of the era, the Weirton, West Virginia Daily Times explained why the holiday switch wasn’t working.

“Congress has no choice now but to enact legislation restoring Nov 11 as Veterans Day. The majority of the states have spoken and the Congress should heed their preference. There’s too much confusion over the two dates,” says an editorial from October 28, 1974.  “All veterans organizations retain the original date.”

A few months after that editorial ran,  46 of the 50 states decided to ignore the federal celebration in October, by either switching back to November 11 or refusing to change the holiday.

By the middle of 1975, Congress had seen enough, and it amended the Uniform Monday Holiday Act to move Veterans Day back to November 11. President Gerald Ford signed the act on September 20, 1975, which called for the move to happen in 1978.

That November, the Carroll Daily Times Herald in Iowa said it was about time Congress did the right thing.

“[Veterans] deserve to be honored on their special day, not as an adjunct to a weekend holiday as Washington tried to force on us,” the newspaper commented.

 

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Ronald Reagan’s Speech, On The 40th Anniversary Of D-Day

This is one of the finest speeches Ronald Reagan ever gave.

I close my eyes and listen to this speech I can picture these young men attacking the Normandy Beaches.

I can see the assault on Point-du-Hoc.

 

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Remembering Pearl Harbor

th1

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 78th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughters will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom.

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil-stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

 

,

A True World War II, Spy Adventure on this Veterans Day

H/T PJ Media.

This is a very interesting story.
We are still free Thanks to men like John(Jack)L.Behling.

behling3

Most of us think we know all about soldiers and spies because we follow the actors who play such roles on television and in the movies. Thus, we see actors engaging in a lot of “action,” and we—at least those of us who have not been soldiers or spies—learn to suspend all disbelief. We are used to seeing a month long battle or even an entire war begin and end within an hour or two, and we leave the theater knowing that, in the end, the “good guys and gals” always triumph.

This is crazy. Even though I myself am an avid fan of television’s NCIS, and most of the World War Two movies (Flags of Our Fathers, Letters from Iwo Jima, Saving Private Ryan, etc.), I am far more interested in the stories of real life soldiers and spies. I want to know what they think, what they do, how they learn their craft. Recently, an incredibly dignified hero came my way.

First, a letter arrived in the old-fashioned manner. The author cordially addressed me as a “colleague in the field of terrorism.” He asked whether I might like to read his unpublished manuscript about Islam and terrorism.

I was about to say no when, on a hunch, I agreed to look at his work.

A package soon arrived which weighed at least five pounds. I opened it and almost immediately began to read his book, which is tentatively titled: The DNA of Terrorism. The work, which focuses on Islamic fundamentalism, is very, very good. Now, I was curious about the author. I wanted to know how he came by this extraordinary knowledge.

Before I could even reach for the phone, he called and suggested we meet. He said:

I must tell you that both I and my wife still adhere to a 1930s dress code.

I plowed through my closet wondering what in God’s name to wear. Gloves? A hat? Nylon stockings? I ended up wearing what I usually do.

Next: “This example of double volunteerism constitutes the essence of patriotism.”

A tall, trim, dapper, white-haired man was waiting for me in my lobby. John (Jack) L. Behling is 91 years old and, although he sports an attractive cane, he still stands ramrod straight. His eyes are piercing. John wears a jaunty beret and his jacket is festooned with possibly six rows of military medals and ribbons representing his patriotic service in the United States infantry, paratroops, and intelligence corps.

Behling was a combat soldier in World War Two. He also worked for the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) and became an undercover espionage agent (a spy) in Europe. He also served in the U.S. Army and Air Force intelligence services and as an intelligence analyst for the U.S. Department of State. Later, he became a diplomat and a professor.

Behling has written an important, even unique, book about Islam, terrorism, the Muslim mind-set, “stealth” jihad, and counterterrorism. I realized that his steely, quiet, but daring deeds as a soldier and an intelligence officer would be of great interest to readers. I urged him to go public with some of his adventures on behalf of America’s and Europe’s freedom. Finally, but reluctantly (“I’ve made my report in full to the proper authorities, this information is in the hands of the right people”), he agreed to go on the record with me. Here is part of our conversation.

Q: How does one become a spy? How did you become a spy?

A: To join the OSS, one had first to volunteer; no one was ever ordered, transferred, or conscripted into OSS without volunteering. Once an OSS-er, one had to volunteer for “mission status.” This example of double volunteerism constitutes the essence of patriotism.

Q: What skills must a spy have?

A: Gen. Donovan, whom President Roosevelt personally chose as his “Co-ordinator of Information,” always stressed imagination and “thinking outside the box.” There is always the unexpected event, the crisis, which must be met without long periods of study and planning. And most likely there will only be one chance, and one chance only, to devise an on-the-spot reaction to crisis or danger to the mission. During peacetime, physical fitness is not so necessary, but it is still helpful. In wartime, it is an absolute requirement. Dedication is a mental fitness; one does not “give up” trying, no matter the circumstances.

Q: What is daily life like in the field?

A: Secret intelligence is a lonely occupation. One gets no mail from home, one cannot communicate with any outside, back-home location or person. Even “chit-chat” with someone in the field is dangerous. One’s linguistic guard is let down, if what is said is not carefully planned and memorized. The agent sleeps very lightly and is constantly alert and on guard with respect to his surroundings. Is someone watching or following me? What exit route can I take if need arises? Is my “contact” under surveillance, waiting for me to show up? Are my contacts equally alert and careful? How can I be sure of anything? If caught, what shall I do to make the earliest possible escape? Will I have to kill my captor? What means will I use? How will I dispose of the body? Will there be a follow up search for me? Will my cover hold up or do I need to manufacture a new one? I have a food and money stash; can I reach it or will it be too dangerous? Every possible vision of disaster runs constantly, like an endless loop through the agent’s mind. All of the above creates a mental tenseness, which must be masked and kept hidden. An agent is often a victim of acid indigestion and has difficulty sleeping.

Next: Why did General Donovan buy refugees’ old clothing?

Q: What do you remember about General Donovan?

A: Donovan immediately approached every refugee coming from Europe and offered to buy the refugees’ old clothing, pens, pencils, match books, pocket litter in general. Why? Because he foresaw the future need for secret agent operations, and they would have to have European-made clothing, watches, etc.

Q: Once they knew that you could speak fluent German without an accent, some Russian, and some Japanese, how did the OSS train you?

A: I was sent to Bari, Italy, to learn Morse code, radio key practice, secure codes and code pads, explosives, RAF jump training, document forgery, photography, and target area study. I practiced these skills with three other paratroopers, one of whom was immediately arrested by the Gestapo because of a failure to recognize a danger signal in radio traffic.

Q: What was your first mission?

A: I was to report on the Herman Goering steel works outside of Linz, Austria. We jumped from British bombers. We used British chutes, which were better than the U.S. chutes at the time. We jumped in uniform, hoping to claim POW status if captured. Another detail was to check the tightness of the harness just before jumping— loose harness straps could leave a bruise on one’s chest or shoulder, something the Gestapo always looked for.

Q: What kind of gun did you carry?

A: We had complete freedom of choice as to weaponry. I chose a small Walther PPK automatic 6.25 mm caliber, and a knife designed for the U.S. Army by British Major Fairbairn (of Hong Kong fame). It was basically a 7-inch bladed stiletto. I carried it on a chain or thong around my neck, hanging down my spine, where I could reach it from a “hands-up” position.

Q: Once you jumped, what did you do with your chute?

A: I buried it together with a small entrenching shovel I carried. I looked for another spot and buried my radio and battery pack. A third spot took whatever I could not carry openly. I wrote myself directions to find these spots again but I wrote it in code, as part of a poem.

Next: Why a spy needs to know how to improvise…

Q: Where did you sleep? Or live?

A: The answer is I slept wherever I happened to be fighting: On the ground, a park bench, a haystack, in a railroad waiting room. I could not rent a room—the police control was too tight. I was essentially a street person. The region was thoroughly Nazi as Adolph Hitler went to school in Linz as a child. I had to find out whether the steel plant was back up and running or still out of commission (after an Allied bombing). I could not just go in and inspect. Day after day, I went to the plant area and hung around with a cup of coffee as if I were a worker. I talked. I listened. I asked questions. Eventually, I was able to construct the answer to this question: No, we did not have to bomb this facility again.

Q: What was your next mission?

A: I was called to Salzburg because I knew some Japanese. All the Japanese diplomats had been rounded up in Berlin and were being kept at a ski resort in Austria. As diplomats, they could not be questioned. But we needed to know 1) Will the German U-boats join up with the Japanese and continue to fight? 2) Will the Japanese government now be willing to discuss surrender? Until now, “surrender” was a forbidden word.

It was suggested that I pass as a waiter. I turned this down. This was a small town and such jobs are inherited family positions. Everyone would know that I did not belong. I came up with a cover story. I would be a guard. I chose the dining room and evening mealtime as my main assignment. The Japanese all spoke German to the hotel staff. I starting talking in German too. They noticed and became curious. I counted on all foreigners believing America was a one-language country and that Americans never did learn a foreign language fluently. (Behling speaks German without an accent.)

Pretty soon, the ambassador, Baron Oshima, approached me and asked how come an American spoke German so easily. That gave me my opening. “But I’m not really an American. I was born in Germany, my father was a professor and we were in the USA on an educational exchange; Hitler declared war, and I was put in an American internment camp for the rest of the war. They put me in here to work off my indebtedness.”

Now, suddenly, it was different. I was one of them—I was an ex-internee. They had a hundred questions to ask: What was it like to be interned in America, what could they expect, what was the American opinion about the war, about invasion casualties? All I had to do was channel the conversation, and pose questions indirectly, obliquely, and answers were forthcoming. On submarines, the ambassador and military attaché told me that the Germans would never get past the Royal Navy in the Indian Ocean, but even if they did, they would stay tied up at Japanese docks, as Japan didn’t have enough fuel for its own subs.

To my surprise, the Japanese believed that if the present government gave way to another, more liberal government, surrender might be discussed. They said it “could be done in around three month.” At that point in time, (we) had no knowledge of the Atomic bomb. But, counting from the time that I was talking with Oshima early in May, three months takes you right up to August 1945, and Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Next: Uncovering a Soviet nuclear facility…

Q: Tell me something about your post-war work as an intelligence analyst.

A: I was assigned to work with the power and fuel team on the Soviet economy and further given personal responsibility for analyzing basic chemicals, pharmaceuticals, atomic energy.

While reading a local 6-page Russian newspaper from the Central Asian state of Tajikistan, I came across an announcement of a local power blackout. No light bulbs over a certain wattage, no exterior lighting, rolling brown-outs, etc. Now Tajikistan is mostly mountains and desert, with a sparse fruit and vegetable cultivation in fertile valleys. Subsistence farming, barely commercial. Not much demand for power. I asked: “Why the big fuss?” Lo and behold, I found that a huge hydroelectric power plant and dam had been finished on the Syr Darya River only a few miles from the black-out area.

Where was all that power going while the small community needs were being denied? I finally told the chief of my section that I had a problem. I said, “I have no data to back me up, but I have an educated guess. I think they might be separating uranium isotopes and starting an enrichment program. It’s (an) ideal area for security purposes; it’s closed to all foreigners. And it’s off the beaten track for almost anything.”

I wrote it up, classified it, and turned it in. A month or so later, the Soviet representative in the United Nations raised a big stink there, complaining about US over flights in that very same area, coming in from the Persian Gulf. Years later, I heard from a third party source that such a facility had been identified there.

My wife is fond of saying, “I know Jack would never leave me for another woman, but I am not so sure about another intelligence mission.” I have to admit there is an element of truth in her statement.

******

I offer this interview as a token of my appreciation and as a contribution to all the men and women who are currently serving or who have ever served our country in a military or intelligence capacity.

******

Flag illustration courtesy Shutterstock.

How Americans fought to restore Veterans Day to November

H/T  Yahoo News.

The American people come together to stop the lunacy of Congress and restored Veterans Day.

 Monday, millions of Americans will take time out to honor our military on the traditional time of 11:11 a.m. on November 11. But there was a time when Congress tried to move the holiday, only to face several years of strong public resistance.

U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kleynia R. McKnight via Wikimedia Commons

U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kleynia R. McKnight via Wikimedia Commons

You may recall from history or civics class that the holiday was first called Armistice Day. It was established after World War I to remember the “war to end all wars,” and it was pegged to the time that a cease-fire, or armistice, that occurred in Europe on November 11, 1918. (World War I officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919 in France.)

A year later, President Woodrow Wilson said the armistice anniversary deserved recognition.

“To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations,” he said.

Armistice Day officially received its name through a congressional resolution that was passed on June 4, 1926. By that time, 27 states had made Armistice Day a legal holiday.

Then, in 1938, Armistice Day officially became a national holiday by law, when an act was passed on May 13, 1938, that made November 11 in each year a legal holiday: “a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as “Armistice Day.”

After World War II, the act was amended to honor veterans of World War II and Korea, and the name of the holiday was changed to Veterans Day in 1954. President Dwight D. Eisenhower marked the occasion with a special proclamation.

However, controversy came to the universally recognized holiday in 1968, when Congress tried to change when Veterans Day was celebrated as a national holiday, by moving the holiday to a Monday at the end of October.

The Uniform Monday Holiday Act was signed on June 28, 1968, and it changed the traditional days for Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day, to ensure that the holidays fell on a Monday, giving federal employees a three-day weekend.

The bill moved Veterans Day, at least on a federal level, to the last Monday in October, with the first observance of the new date in 1971.

Veterans groups moved quickly to oppose the date switch, and two states refused to switch their dates in 1971. By 1974, there was confusion over the two dates and most states took a pass on commemorating the holiday in October.

In a typical editorial of the era, the Weirton, West Virginia Daily Times explained why the holiday switch wasn’t working.

“Congress has no choice now but to enact legislation restoring Nov 11 as Veterans Day. The majority of the states have spoken and the Congress should heed their preference. There’s too much confusion over the two dates,” says an editorial from October 28, 1974.  “All veterans organizations retain the original date.”

A few months after that editorial ran,  46 of the 50 states decided to ignore the federal celebration in October, by either switching back to November 11 or refusing to change the holiday.

By the middle of 1975, Congress had seen enough, and it amended the Uniform Monday Holiday Act to move Veterans Day back to November 11. President Gerald Ford signed the act on September 20, 1975, which called for the move to happen in 1978.

That November, the Carroll Daily Times Herald in Iowa said it was about time Congress did the right thing.

“[Veterans] deserve to be honored on their special day, not as an adjunct to a weekend holiday as Washington tried to force on us,” the newspaper commented.